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How Can You Tell If Your Cannabis Bud Is No Good?

By Terry Hacienda, The Fresh Toast on

Published in Cannabis Daily

Step Four: Inspect the Combusted Weed

When you light up the rolled-up buds, check if the buds give up sparks when you inhale. Also, check what the flame looks like immediately and after the weed is lit. If you hear a crackling sound when you drag on the buds, it is very possible that your buds are contaminated.

Also, check the flavor and smell given off by the weed; as soon as you detect an abnormal odor, you should put down the weed and stop inhaling.

Step Five: Inspect The Leftovers

This is the last process. If the previous inspections did not give off any weird results, there’s still a need to observe the ash left behind. A non contaminated bud will leave dark gray ash, which is obviously dry and soft to touch. If you see jet black, hard or greasy ash, then your buds contain one or more contaminants. Types of Cannabis Contaminants Cannabis is often exposed — directly or indirectly — to contaminants. The common culprits include sugar, sand, Brix fertilizer, hairspray, and industrial pesticides or fertilizers.

Sand

 

Sand is one of the natural residues that can slip past the inspection of even the most experienced cannabis connoisseurs. Sand is an unavoidable material in agricultural operations, so there’s a high chance it contaminates the products by accident. Some unscrupulous growers tend to add sand on purpose to their products because it gives the buds a shinier and heavier look.

It is always advisable to shake out your buds and sift through the ground ones before packaging.

Industrial Pesticides or Fertilizers

These often appear in commercially grown cannabis buds. Their presence in cannabis products can put consumers at risk of developing life-threatening ailments. Many of these chemicals are out for credible reasons, such as protecting crops and maximizing growth. However,  the consumption of these hazardous chemicals over time can result in diseases such as neurotoxicity and asthma.

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