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Kevin Spacey, ready for a Hollywood return, 'can't pay the bills that I owe'

Alexandra Del Rosario, Los Angeles Times on

Published in Entertainment News

LOS ANGELES — Kevin Spacey doesn't have "All the Money in the World."

Seven years after he was accused of sexual assault by multiple people, the embattled actor — who was famously replaced in the 2017 Ridley Scott drama — revealed that is far from the case. Spacey, hoping to jump-start his screen career, revealed in a recent interview that he is facing "considerable" debt.

"I can't pay the bills that I owe," he said in an interview with Piers Morgan published Tuesday. "Been a couple times when I thought I was gonna file [for bankruptcy] but we've managed to sort of dodge it."

For 90 minutes, the two-time Oscar winner reflected on the aftermath of his #MeToo moment and its impact on his personal life, career and finances. The "House of Cards" and "Usual Suspects" star, 64, teared up as Morgan asked about his current living situation.

He revealed that his longtime home in Baltimore is facing foreclosure and will be "sold at auction." He added that he's unsure where he will stay next and said he needs to put his belongings in storage. When pressed about how much money he currently has, Spacey told Morgan, "None."

"I still owe a lot of legal bills," he said, before adding that he has "many millions" in debt. He did not disclose a specific amount.

His solution to dig himself out? "Get back on the horse."

Spacey was among the high-profile men who became persona non grata when he faced scathing allegations of sexual assault and misconduct from multiple people in 2017. In recent years, Spacey successfully fended off a multimillion-dollar lawsuit from accuser Anthony Rapp and was found not guilty by a London jury of sexually assaulting four men during his tenure as artistic director at the Old Vic theater.

Reemerging into public consciousness with multiple media appearances, Spacey continues to make it clear he's ready to work again.

 

"What I hope for is that I have the opportunity to continue to tell stories," he told Morgan, "because that's what I feel I was put on this earth to do."

In addition to touting his comeback ambitions, Spacey boasted to Morgan — and previously to ousted CNN veteran turned NewsNation anchor Chris Cuomo — about the emotional work he has put in to move forward from the allegations. He spoke about having "nothing to hide" and wanting to live a "more open life," and also about the dark periods of his downfall.

"I didn't know if I was going to survive," he said, had he not gone to rehab and received support from longtime friends Evan Lowenstein and Elton John, who testified at the actor's London sexual assault trial in July 2023.

In the interview, he also addressed his "bad behavior," which he defined as "pushing the boundaries, being too handsy, touching someone sexually in a way that I didn't know they didn't want." He refuted the idea he groped other people by clarifying that he was "gentle" and "caressed" them instead. He also doubled down on his denial of Rapp's claims, saying that he hopes "someday Anthony Rapp can accept that he had a faulty memory."

Additionally, Spacey denied any personal connections with Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell and criticized Netflix for its "strange" and "wrong" decision to cut ties with its "House of Cards" star amid the allegations. He also turned his attention — again — to the Channel 4 documentary "Spacey Unmasked," which he condemned in May as "one-sided."

After the documentary's release, several of Spacey's Hollywood colleagues including Liam Neeson, Sharon Stone, Stephen Fry and F. Murray Abraham voiced public support for the actor and demanded his comeback.

In Tuesday's interview, Spacey declared, "I do believe that the majority of people would like me to get back to work."


©2024 Los Angeles Times. Visit latimes.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

 

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