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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Anyone familiar with Edward Winter’s Chess Notes website knows his ability to dig up stuff from the dusty corners of chess history. I have his original printed volume one from 1982. Here’s an instructive lesson from a game apparently won by a Mr. Leonard Walls. Here’s your challenge: Can White draw here? Is 1.b4 a good or bad move?

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

At London, 1883, World Champion William Steinitz took it on the chin from Rosenthal. Can you see the epaulette position possibility? (hint: it’s different in structure from the previous two, but the concept is the same—the king is blocked from escape by his own pieces)

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s another look at an epaulette mate won by Helling in 1934.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re going to look at epaulette mates this week. Given that hint, this first one by J. Krejcik in 1908, should be a pretty easy mate in three.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

It’s easy to imagine this position arising. It’s easy to imagine your opponent offering a draw. It’s easy to imagine your not wanting a draw and thinking while your opponent says, “C’mon, I can let you have both my pawns and you can’t win because you’re a-pawn’s queening square is the wrong color for your bishop.” Then, you see...

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This endgame, Ljubojevic-Browne,1972, has reached a point where Black can win or draw, depending on what move he plays. In the game, GM Walter Browne picked the wrong move. Even “simple” king and pawn endings can be tough on grandmasters, not just amateurs. How does Black win this?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re going to have some fun with an exercise in logic. Those two words, fun and logic, don’t go together too often. We might even add educational. It’s White to play and mate in 16 moves. That might ordinarily scare you off, but it shouldn’t this time if you think logically. Give it a try. Ask yourself, what do you know, what will the ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This week is Two Rooks Week! This is our last example—a composition by Prokes. The two rooks in this composition have their work cut out for them as two Black pawns are about to promote to queens.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This week is Two Rooks Week! Today, we have a study by L. Prokes with the two rooks vs the queen, but there’s more to it.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This week is Two Rooks Week! Rooks working in pairs will be featured. We start with an easy one, but it does take some thought to come up with the best solution. One more thing: make sure Black puts up a stubborn defense! It is from a study by H. Rinck.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A fun puzzle for a Friday. The author is unknown, which is a shame, as he had quite a chess sense of humor.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here, Black gets to show his stuff. For you to show your stuff, you must consider variations where Black tries not to cooperate!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

U.S. master Brian Wall posted a great Sergey Karjakin game on facebook. With this position, he embarked on a winning kingside attack. What would your plan be? To really count as a plan, you should be able to give the first four moves. To be a grandmaster, you should see it all to the end!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Those of you familiar with the famous Troitzky study from 1895 should get this. In Troitzky’s study there was a White king on d5, a White bishop on e3 and a White pawn on g6 with a Black pawn on h7 and e7 and Black king on f8. Does that refresh your memory? This study is from Gunst in 1922.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

You can see the endgame challenge here. If it were just king and pawn vs. king, it would be easy for Black to draw. The composer, V. Kosek added the little grouping on the right. The knight appears not to be able to move because of the loss of the pawn. So how does White win?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This composition was an improved one based on an earlier composition idea by J. De Velleneuve Esclapon in 1909. Walter Korn and N. Guttman fixed it in 1961 and we end up with the diagram seen.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s our last Alekhine finish. It’s against Yates at Semmering in 1926. Yates was no pushover and beat Alekhine twice.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re taking game positions from the new Alekhine book by Isaak and Vladimir Linder (Russell Enterprises). I’ve been impressed by their attention to the details of Alekhine’s life, some of which is quite new to me. I also enjoy their use of historical themes in chess. For example, experienced players will immediately look at one move that ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Russell Enterprises continues to pop out interesting books. This new book by Isaak and Vladimir Linder is the biography and games of “Alexander Alekhine, Fourth World Chess Champion.” Their historical research and interpretations are particularly interesting, and I consider a welcomed addition to my shelf of Alekhine books. We will look at ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is a mating position. It requires you to remember a little known tip in chess.

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