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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This week is “Attack Like a Master” week. The key word again to remember in attacking a castled king is ACCESS. You must get access to the king.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This week will be “Attack Like a Master” week. The key word to remember in attacking a castled king is ACCESS. You must get access to the king.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This position could almost be considered one of the standard opening positions to avoid as Black and to know as White. Black’s jumbled up pieces allow White to win quickly.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s a mate in four by Coombs of New Zealand—with a hint! The hint is that the bishop on f2 is in on every move.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

I just couldn’t resist sharing this two-mover. Have fun!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This position, composed by R.K. Guy in 1943, is really quite something. The first move is only understood 9 (!) moves later. It’s a challenge. And if you don’t get it, play through the lines. The instruction is invaluable, and the appreciation of the artistry is gratifying.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This position, from a real game—Parr-Wheatcroft, London, 1938—has a truly unique mating attack. Good luck!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s a very challenging mate in three for your Labor Day enjoyment. Composed by Kurt Richter and J. Koers.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Kurt Richter was a famous attacking master. In this position, though, he is the exchange down and must find a way to save the game and win. How did he do it?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re continuing with a selection from the Neumann book published by McFarland (McFarlandBooks.com. In this position, Neumann finds himself a piece down (he had given odds) with a mate threatened on g2. He comes up with a great perpetual check to save the game.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

If you are a chess history fan or just a fan of 19th century romantic attacking chess, McFarland has put out one of its usual magnificent clothbound gems—this time about 19th century Berlin Chess: “Neumann, Herschfeld and Suhle.” It contains 711 games with notes and authors Hans Renette and Fabrizio Zavatarelli have done a remarkable ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

You have no doubt been told, if you’ve played a while, that bishops of opposite colors endgames are drawn. A cursory look at this position would only seem to reinforce that idea; however, White has a win here!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Rook and Pawn endings are always good to review. This one requires White to take advantage of the Black king’s awkward position.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Black’s queen is being attacked by White’s, but J. Purdy as Black figured out a way to beat Vaughan in 1945.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A very instructive position in how to tear apart a castled position that has its pawns move forward. Noteboom-Promer, Prague, 1931, and make sure you include the bishop in the fun!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We have a whole game today. It is one of the best examples of what happens when you don’t develop your pieces. In this case, Black only moved his king! What should you do as White to punish Black, and can you see it all the way through to the end?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s a mate in 4 that is unusual in that the final mating position is actually on the board! You just have to figure out how to make that bishop sitting on h1 the mating piece from that square.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A composition by Heyeker in 1925. Called a tough nut to crack by Maizelis. A mate in 3.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is a composition by Prokes. It’s unusual in that the first move is really easy to find. White doesn’t have much choice but to play 1.Rg5, but then what does White do after 1…h2? SOMEBODY is going to become a promoted pawn!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Be careful! It’s not as easy as it looks.

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