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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

While browsing through a 1929 British Chess Magazine volume looking for Christmas problems for the next month, I ran across this epic adventure by Dr. Blathy, who used it as a diagram for chess Christmas cards he sent out. It is White to Play and Win. Some warnings: Black should not take the h-pawn as he has to hustle over to defend the b-pawn. ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Endgames are most players’ weak spot. This “simple” bishop and pawn ending demonstrates just how intricate chess can get. White has to figure out how to advance his pawn to promotion without letting Black give up his bishop for the pawn. A lesson-filled endgame.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

From arguably the most famous game in chess history, or at least the most used by chess instructors!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A fun composition by Neilson. A fine exercise in planning. Because it’s a mate in four, I’ll give some hints: 1.Pick the most likely square you’re going to mate on. Your instinct will probably be correct. 2. There are no checks until mate!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This composition (author unknown) is really cute, if I can use that word in chess. There are several mates in four, but only one mate in three—find the three mover!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is an instructional problem that I dust off every few years because it’s a favorite of mine. It’s a mating attack!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Another study by Prokes, but this one is a little longer.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A study by Prokes in 1941

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Keres beat Wade in 1954 with this finish.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

An artistic finish by Tarrasch invoking the problem composer’s Plachutta theme (called interference by practical players. That should give you a hint!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A finish by Spassky against Petrosian in the 1969 world championship. The value of a pawn on the 7th.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s the final piece of our game in three parts. What would you do if White took the queen after 13…Ng5?

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here we are with the promised Part II. In the game White played 13.Nf3. Two questions: What would you as Black play if White takes the queen instead of moving the knight to f3? Since White did play 13.Nf3, what do you as Black play now?

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Due to some technical difficulties, part II of our previous puzzle will have to wait until Friday. Here’s a quickie: from Saidy-Lombardy, 1969. Black played one move and White Resigned. What was it?

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re going to do things a little differently today. We’re going to give you a game in pieces. What move would you play here and why?

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A very pretty finish by amateur allies against Ruben Fine in a simul in 1937.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

If you look at the diagram and wonder how the king got to where it is, the whole game score is below. It’s a mate in 5 from the diagram.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A great oldie demonstrating a time honored sacrifice, but can you see it all the way to the end?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

From a Max Lange Attack, Brown-Gibbs, London, 1918.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

You’re getting the whole game today because it’s such a nicely developed attack. From the 1908 British Championship, Palmer v. Gunsberg.

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