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'All you want is to be believed': The impacts of unconscious bias in health care

By April Dembosky, KQED, Kaiser Health News on

Published in Health & Fitness

In mid-March, Karla Monterroso flew home to Alameda, California, after a hiking trip in Utah's Zion National Park. Four days later, she began to develop a bad, dry cough. Her lungs felt sticky.

The fevers that persisted for the next nine weeks grew so high — 100.4, 101.2, 101.7, 102.3 — that, on the worst night, she was in the shower on all fours, ice-cold water running down her back, willing her temperature to go down.

"That night I had written down in a journal, letters to everyone I'm close to, the things I wanted them to know in case I died," she remembered.

Then, in the second month, came a new batch of symptoms: headaches and shooting pains in her legs and abdomen that made her worry she could be at risk for the blood clots and strokes that other COVID-19 patients in their 30s had reported.

Still, she wasn't sure if she should go to the hospital.

"As women of color, you get questioned a lot about your emotions and the truth of your physical state. You get called an exaggerator a lot throughout the course of your life," said Monterroso, who is Latina. "So there was this weird, 'I don't want to go and use resources for nothing' feeling."

 

It took four friends to convince her she needed to call 911.

But what happened in the emergency room at Alameda Hospital only confirmed her worst fears.

At nearly every turn during her emergency room visit, Monterroso said, providers dismissed her symptoms and concerns. Her low blood pressure? That's a false reading. Her cycling oxygen levels? The machine's wrong. The shooting pains in her leg? Probably just a cyst.

"The doctor came in and said, 'I don't think that much is happening here. I think we can send you home,'" Monterroso recalled.

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