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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Rook and Pawn endings are always good to review. This one requires White to take advantage of the Black king’s awkward position.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Black’s queen is being attacked by White’s, but J. Purdy as Black figured out a way to beat Vaughan in 1945.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A very instructive position in how to tear apart a castled position that has its pawns move forward. Noteboom-Promer, Prague, 1931, and make sure you include the bishop in the fun!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We have a whole game today. It is one of the best examples of what happens when you don’t develop your pieces. In this case, Black only moved his king! What should you do as White to punish Black, and can you see it all the way through to the end?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s a mate in 4 that is unusual in that the final mating position is actually on the board! You just have to figure out how to make that bishop sitting on h1 the mating piece from that square.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A composition by Heyeker in 1925. Called a tough nut to crack by Maizelis. A mate in 3.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is a composition by Prokes. It’s unusual in that the first move is really easy to find. White doesn’t have much choice but to play 1.Rg5, but then what does White do after 1…h2? SOMEBODY is going to become a promoted pawn!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Be careful! It’s not as easy as it looks.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This mating composition was allegedly composed by Pope John Paul II, a chess aficionado. In any event it’s a cute one to start off the week.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This mating composition is an exercise in iron clad logic. Find the mating position. See how Black can stop it. Force Black to do something he doesn’t want to do. Go on with the plan.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We haven’t had a composed problem in a while, so we’ll throw in a mate in two.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

The Peruvian master, Canal, was a fierce attacking player, even out of calm positions. Here he uses the drawish exchange line vs. the MacCutcheon variation in the French. In the diagram he unleashed a smashing kingside attack.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A great attacking game against the French Defense with dxe4. The whole game is given so you can enjoy how it evolved.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Either 1.f6 or 1.g6 win, but which one is better?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A mate in four someone posted on facebook. Very cute, especially since it ends up in a standard K+R vs. K checkmate! Enough of a clue?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A mate in three, from Mayet-Hanstein, date uncertain, but played in Berlin.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

As it is summer, it’s a good time to review things.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Our last Evans Gambit position. This one was won by Tarrasch back in 1889. White’s two key advantages are the long diagonal occupied by the bishop on b2 and the control of the d-file by the rook. There’s a mate coming!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Another Evans Gambit finish from Steinitz-Pilhal, Vienna, 1862.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

An Evans Gambit finish from DeRiviere-Journoux, Paris, 1860. White’s queen is under attack and he is material down. What did he do?

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