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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re continuing our advance start on “chess summer school.” One of the important things to do in teaching beginners is to show them mating patterns. This often involves sacrifices, so it expands their minds in terms of possibilities to look for. We always reinforce the idea of lok at ALL checks and captures. This example is an old favorite.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re continuing our advance start on “chess summer school.” If you look at the first two lessons, we see that the Opposition is critical to understanding king and pawn endings. What we have here is yet another. Set up this position for your student and have them play to win.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re continuing our advance start on “chess summer school.” One of the best ways to demonstrate to beginners just how subtle chess can be with a few pieces on the board is to do king and pawn endings. They can be tricky. Our previous one showed how important opposition is and how one mistake can end the game in stalemate. Today’s is a ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

When my sons were little, I used to have morning “Dad’s summer school” lessons on just about anything during the long break. It meant they wouldn’t camp out in front of the TV set to start their day. As the end of the school year coming upon us, I’m going to start with some basic lessons for this week and then do one every Monday. If ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Years ago, I set up this problem for a group of young beginners with the question, “What is your best move here?” They had been told to always look for all checks and captures, so they went at it. Nobody found the right answer! I’ve used my little construction for many years now with beginners with the same result, yet I keep doing it ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is a very fluid position with lots of possibilities for moves for both sides, yet in Karaklaic-Nedeljkovic, Yugoslavia, 1957, White ended this game with a forced mate.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In the famous Baku 1961 tournament, Bagirov apparently played Re1 with the idea of exchanges of rooks and a probable draw in prospect; however Cholmov had a little surprise in store for him. What was it?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Some chess players see composed problems as not being practical. Here’s one that certainly is and looks composed, but it tests a player’s ability to use some very practical themes from normal play. Here’s a mate in three that does a good job with that.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

You can prove in this position that, even though material is even, you could win decisively in short order.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

When your opponent’s kingside is broken up and his pieces are not around the castled position, and your pieces are poised for action, there just has to be a way to finish the game in short order. This position is a good example of that.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Chess teachers are fond of teaching elementary ideas such as back rank mates and Philidor’s Legacy or Lucena Position (some people still fight about the name copyright), but did you know you can use both themes in one position?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This game position attracted my attention because it is a variation on a common theme in chess—the back rank mate threat. Can you, using this them idea, come up with how to win this?

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

One of our favorite books for the average player who wants a decent coverage of chess in most of its aspects is Graham Burgess’s The Mammoth Book of Chess, later called simply Chess. I was browsing his book this week and decided to share some of the puzzles he includes in the book. The first one is from Karic-Justin, Yugoslavia, 1987. Black ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This finish of the game was accomplished by Tolush in 1947.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s another Helling special. He was a rook down, but found the quickest way to mate his opponent. Your turn!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Black’s a pawn up, but White has a trick up his sleeve. Won by Helling in 1933.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s a blast from the past…the 19th century. White wastes time with some pawn moves and Black takes advantage of it. The game started out: Horwitz-Bledow, 1837: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Bb6 5.d4 Qe7 6.d5 Nd8 7.Be2 d6 8.h3 f5 9.Bg5 Nf6 10.Nbd2 0–0 11.Nh4 fxe4 12.Nxe4 … (see diagram)

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This game ended with a real double treat of a sacrifice. Szabo resigned after White’s very first move as he saw it, finally. Can you see it? From Boros-Szabo, Budapest, 1937.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

There are quite a few mates in four here. Can you checkmate Black in THREE moves?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is a great lesson for beginners as to why you don’t give up the center. Albin’s play is spot on as he attacks the heck out of Black’s position. How does he end it?

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