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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

One of our favorite books for the average player who wants a decent coverage of chess in most of its aspects is Graham Burgess’s The Mammoth Book of Chess, later called simply Chess. I was browsing his book this week and decided to share some of the puzzles he includes in the book. The first one is from Karic-Justin, Yugoslavia, 1987. Black ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This finish of the game was accomplished by Tolush in 1947.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s another Helling special. He was a rook down, but found the quickest way to mate his opponent. Your turn!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Black’s a pawn up, but White has a trick up his sleeve. Won by Helling in 1933.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s a blast from the past…the 19th century. White wastes time with some pawn moves and Black takes advantage of it. The game started out: Horwitz-Bledow, 1837: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Bb6 5.d4 Qe7 6.d5 Nd8 7.Be2 d6 8.h3 f5 9.Bg5 Nf6 10.Nbd2 0–0 11.Nh4 fxe4 12.Nxe4 … (see diagram)

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This game ended with a real double treat of a sacrifice. Szabo resigned after White’s very first move as he saw it, finally. Can you see it? From Boros-Szabo, Budapest, 1937.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

There are quite a few mates in four here. Can you checkmate Black in THREE moves?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is a great lesson for beginners as to why you don’t give up the center. Albin’s play is spot on as he attacks the heck out of Black’s position. How does he end it?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is a position supposedly reached by the great attacking player Adolf Anderssen against an equally formidable Johannes Zukertort at Breslau in 1862. “Allegedly” comes up because it isn’t in the database, although that doesn’t mean it wasn’t played. It may have been an offhand game. In any event Anderssen managed a draw from this ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

When I first saw this position diagrammed in Chess Life many years ago, I thought it was a composed problem. Why? Well, by what strange series of moves in a real game could the White king end up on h8? It turned out it was an actual game. For those of you interested in how that came about, the whole game is given below. Either way, the question ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Finding this position while rummaging for a good grandmaster kingside attack was a pleasant surprise for me, personally. I’ve known GM John Fedorowicz since he was a promising young teenager. John fulfilled his promise when he won the World Open many years ago and has had many memorable games and tournament successes. When we had dinner last ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

As you can see, that little group in the lower left hand corner is irrelevant to solving this problem. However, it does make an interesting point. If the king were where the White pawn on f6 is, and the lower left-hand corner group were gone, White couldn’t force a mate with just a king and two knights. The lowly pawn gets to show why it can ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

It’s a mate in three, but take care as it can get tricky.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In a chess club, beginners will often observe a couple of strong players going over a game they just played with each other or against some third party where the one strong player is bragging to the other about his game. Oftentimes the beginners will hear, “I really dominated the dark squares.” or “My light squared bishop controlled the ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Simple question: how does White draw this? Black seems able to prevent White from getting at the pawn with his rook. How do you solve this dilemma?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Reader Jim Williams wrote in to ask for the complete score of the Morphy game from Friday’s puzzle so he could see how it developed. I couldn’t find the game in my database, so I checked Sergeant’s Morphy’s Games of Chess. Found it! It was at odds of the queen knight, which was interesting. The reason it didn’t show up in the database ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s a classic. In fact, it may be the first example of an “epaulette mate.” Played by Paul Morphy against an amateur in the 19th century.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

One of my favorite endgame composers is R.K. Guy, who created some magnificent work in the 1930s and 1940s. Now we all know that a king and two knights cannot force a mate against a lone king.You can only stalemate him at best. However, if that lone king has just one pawn, he can be in trouble as long as that pawn can move because White can trap...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is a position I just made up because of a contest in the March Chess Life. It’s not for the contest, though. It’s for you. What would you play here?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

No Evans Gambit study would be complete without the “Evergreen” game, which is arguably the greatest Evans Gambit every played.

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