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It's Time to Restore Fading Families

Terence P. Jeffrey on

Utah, Idaho and Wyoming all share common borders and something else that matters more.

According to data the Census Bureau gathered in 2020, these were three of the four states that had the highest percentages of households headed by married couples of the opposite sex.

New Hampshire also ranked in the top four.

In 2020, 57.8% of the households in Utah were headed by married couples of the opposite sex. In Idaho, it was 53.7%.

However, these were the only states in the country where the percentage of households headed by opposite-sex married couples constituted a majority of all households. In New Hampshire, which ranked third, only 49.4% of households were headed by opposite-sex married couples. In Wyoming, which ranked fourth, it was 48.9%.

Rounding out the top 10 states when ranked by this demographic were Kansas (48.5%); Nebraska (48.5%); Minnesota (48.4%); New Jersey (48.3%); Hawaii (48.2%) and Iowa (48.2%).

 

Which states ranked at the bottom for the percentage of households headed by opposite-sex married couples?

New York came in last. Only 40.6% of the households there were headed by opposite-sex married couples. Louisiana was next-to-last at 40.7%; and Rhode Island and New Mexico were tied for second-to-last at 41.3%.

The rest of the bottom 10 included Mississippi (41.5%); Ohio (43.9%); Massachusetts (44.1%); Alabama (44.3%) and Georgia (44.7%).

Although the District of Columbia -- our nation's capital -- is not a state, the Census Bureau included it in its data table that presented the state-by-state percentages of households headed by opposite-sex married couples. Had it been a state, the District of Columbia would have finished in last place -- by far. Only 22.8% of the households there were headed by opposite-sex married couples.

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