Senior Living

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Health

What seniors can expect as their new normal in a post-vaccine world

Imagine this scenario, perhaps a year or two in the future: An effective COVID-19 vaccine is routinely available and the world is moving forward. Life, however, will likely never be the same - particularly for people over 60.

That is the conclusion of geriatric medical doctors, aging experts, futurists and industry specialists. Experts say ...Read more

What seniors can expect as their new normal in a post-vaccine world

Imagine this scenario, perhaps a year or two in the future: An effective COVID-19 vaccine is routinely available and the world is moving forward. Life, however, will likely never be the same -- particularly for people over 60.

That is the conclusion of geriatric medical doctors, aging experts, futurists and industry specialists. Experts say ...Read more

Technology divide between senior 'haves' and 'have-nots' roils pandemic response

Family gatherings on Zoom and FaceTime. Online orders from grocery stores and pharmacies. Telehealth appointments with physicians.

These have been lifesavers for many older adults staying at home during the coronavirus pandemic. But an unprecedented shift to virtual interactions has a downside: Large numbers of seniors are unable to participate...Read more

Se retiró y no le fue bien. A los 84 años, está felizmente empleada

FILADELFIA — Durante años, Connie Kleinschmidt ha escuchado la misma pregunta de sus amigos:

"¿Sigues trabajando?"

Kleinschmidt, de 84 años (cumplirá 85 a fin de mes), no conoce a mucha gente de su edad que tenga un empleo. Y ella es evidentemente la empleada de más edad en Rite Aid en Upper Darby, donde charla con los ...Read more

She retired once. It didn't go well. So at 84, she's happily employed

PHILADELPHIA - For years, Connie Kleinschmidt has been hearing the same question from friends:

"Are you still working?"

Kleinschmidt, 84 - she'll be 85 at the end of the month - doesn't know many people her age who are employed. And she's clearly the oldest clerk at Rite Aid in Upper Darby, where she chats up customers while ringing...Read more

Lonely during the pandemic? Ohio launches free daily check-in calls for seniors

The Ohio Department of Aging has launched a pilot program offering a friendly ear to state residents ages 60 and older who are craving a conversation or human connection during the pandemic.

The telephone chats, which began last month, are open to anyone in that age group who signs up for Staying Connected, a free, daily automated check-in ...Read more

Life beyond COVID seclusion: Seniors see challenges and change ahead

Months into the coronavirus pandemic, older adults are having a hard time envisioning their "new normal."

Many remain fearful of catching the virus and plan to follow strict precautions - social distancing, wearing masks and gloves, limiting excursions to public places - for the indefinite future.

Mortality is no longer an ...Read more

She retired once. It didn't go well. So at 84, she's happily employed

PHILADELPHIA -- For years, Connie Kleinschmidt has been hearing the same question from friends:

"Are you still working?"

Kleinschmidt, 84 -- she'll be 85 at the end of the month -- doesn't know many people her age who are employed. And she's clearly the oldest clerk at Rite Aid in Upper Darby, where she chats up customers while ringing up ...Read more

Lonely during the pandemic? Ohio launches free daily check-in calls for seniors

The Ohio Department of Aging has launched a pilot program offering a friendly ear to state residents ages 60 and older who are craving a conversation or human connection during the pandemic.

The telephone chats, which began last month, are open to anyone in that age group who signs up for Staying Connected, a free, daily automated check-in ...Read more

States allow in-person nursing home visits as families charge residents die 'of broken hearts'

States across the country are beginning to roll back heart-wrenching policies instituted when the coronavirus pandemic began and allow in-person visits at nursing homes and assisted living centers, offering relief to frustrated families.

For the most part, visitors are required to stay outside and meet relatives in gardens or on patios where ...Read more

Rehab program helps COVID-19 survivors regain what the virus took away

RALEIGH, N.C. - In a gym full of bar bells, stationary bikes and other work-out equipment, Nadar Atari is hunched over a table, pencil in hand, trying to finish a Sudoku puzzle.

The puzzle is part of Atari's rehabilitation after two months at WakeMed being treated for COVID-19, including 15 days in an induced coma with a breathing tube down ...Read more

Travel Trending with Kathy Witt: South Carolina's Wild Dunes Resort a relaxing refuge amidst pandemic

The South Carolina resort community of Wild Dunes draws you in the same way a beautiful landscape painting at a museum pulls you to it. With each step closer, more and richer color, texture and detail are revealed – the pastels of the vacation homes and condos given contrast by green layers of hedges and the leafy canopies of the hardwoods, ...Read more

Outdoor time eases pandemic stress for dementia patients

DUBLIN, Ohio - Nancy Moore used the spading fork to loosen the dirt and then she pulled a few weeds from among the petunias and the marigolds in the raised flower bed.

She wasn't terribly excited about the task because gardening isn't really her thing - the 90-year-old former dance teacher would much rather be tapping - but this is what her ...Read more

Polar adventurer marks 100th birthday, 81 years after his first expedition to Antarctica

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - Robert Johnson, who turned 100 in early July, on a hot and sunny Florida day, barely hesitated when asked what he'd do if given another chance to go to Antarctica, the land of eternal ice and snow that he first journeyed to as a teenager.

"It would be very tempting, it would," he said. "That place stays in ...Read more

Wharton professor Olivia Mitchell on America's post-COVID retirement outlook

"The outlook for retirement is worse than a year ago," Wharton professor Olivia Mitchell said matter-of-factly in an interview recently. "We're now in a different world."

In a Q&A, The Inquirer asked her to elaborate on what the post-COVID world means for America's retirement savers and those who have already retired. ...Read more

States allow in-person nursing home visits as families charge residents die 'of broken hearts'

States across the country are beginning to roll back heart-wrenching policies instituted when the coronavirus pandemic began and allow in-person visits at nursing homes and assisted living centers, offering relief to frustrated families.

For the most part, visitors are required to stay outside and meet relatives in gardens or on patios where ...Read more

Estudio vincula el pensamiento negativo repetitivo con mayor riesgo de demencia

Nadie puede ser positivo todo el tiempo, pero un nuevo estudio sugiere que deberíamos tratar de ser menos negativos.

Investigadores de University College London (UCL) descubrieron que el pensamiento negativo persistente podría aumentar el riesgo de desarrollar la enfermedad de Alzheimer.

Para el estudio, investigadores de UCL, la McGill ...Read more

What seniors should know before going ahead with elective procedures

For months, Patricia Merryweather-Arges, a health care expert, has fielded questions about the coronavirus pandemic from fellow Rotary Club members in the Midwest.

Recently people have wondered "Is it safe for me to go see my doctor? Should I keep that appointment with my dentist? What about that knee replacement I put on hold: Should I ...Read more

What seniors should know before going ahead with elective procedures

For months, Patricia Merryweather-Arges, a health care expert, has fielded questions about the coronavirus pandemic from fellow Rotary Club members in the Midwest.

Recently people have wondered "Is it safe for me to go see my doctor? Should I keep that appointment with my dentist? What about that knee replacement I put on hold: Should I ...Read more

Seniors in low-income housing live in fear of COVID infection

Davetta Brooks, 75, who has heart failure, a fractured hip and macular degeneration, is afraid. Conditions in her low-income senior building on Chicago's Near West Side - the Congressman George W. Collins Apartments - are "deplorable," she said.

Residents are not wearing masks or gloves to guard against the coronavirus, she said: &...Read more

 

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