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Am I wrong?

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From the writings of the Rev. Billy Graham

Q: A relationship with my dearest friend has been destroyed because she believes I have been a hypocrite as a Christian, speaking of God’s love but not accepting ungodly behaviors from some of our mutual friends. I’m accused of being selfish and misrepresenting Jesus, who, she says, wants everyone to have the desires of their heart, and that the world should have brotherly love toward all. I’ve done all I can to help her understand that God’s love is offered to everyone, but He doesn’t love the sin that we continue in, nor are we to follow worldly culture. Am I wrong? – L.B.

A: Believers are wise to consider accusations from others because it allows us a chance to examine the motives of our hearts and correct what may be wrong. But certainly not every accusation is justified.

Sometimes accusers lash out because down deep they know they are wrong and insist that their interpretation of what God declares in His Word is according to their way of living.

The architect of popular culture is none other than Satan. He is the chief designer and chief marketer, and he has been branding worldliness since the beginning of time. His methods are shifty and constantly in motion, changing fads, trends, and lifestyles to keep the world running in circles. Worldliness is an inner attitude that puts self at the center of life instead of God. Too many people today want a brotherly world in which they can remain unbrotherly, a decent world in which they can live indecently.

 

The Christian is beset by secular and worldly propaganda, but Scripture says, “Do not love the world nor the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him” (1 John 2:15 NASB).

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(This column is based on the words and writings of the late Rev. Billy Graham.)

©2023 Billy Graham Literary Trust. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


(c)2023 BILLY GRAHAM DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.


 

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