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ArcaMax

Going for the Handyman Special

Cliff Ennico on

"I am a general contractor and builder whose business has gone downhill with the current housing downturn. I have decided to start a local handyman business to help ride out the storm. I would greatly appreciate your opinion of this business in this market."

With new home construction winding down due to higher interest rates and a shortage of workers, a lot of building contractors are sitting on their hands wondering how they will survive the coming rough times. Congratulations for realizing that you will have to "reinvent" yourself to keep your head above water.

Here are some tips:

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL

A couple of years ago, you couldn't get a contractor to do a small job for love or money, unless you were married to him. In tough times, people will still pay to have little jobs done, especially if they're messy, difficult or dangerous. Let the world know you will do them for a fair price.

GO BEYOND CONTRACTOR HOURS

 

Be prepared to work evenings and weekends; that's when your customers are home, the washing machine breaks down, and they realize for the first time that the bathtub faucet in the upstairs bathroom they never use has been leaking for weeks.

SAY YES TO EVERYTHING

This is not a time for specialists. If it's a leaky faucet or a clogged carburetor on a snowblower, fix it. If it's a retaining wall that's falling down, cement it. If it's a squirrel in someone's attic, relocate or, ahem, terminate it with extreme prejudice.

BILL PROMPTLY

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