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Write On!

Bob Goldman on

Our sermon for today concerns a workplace problem that everyone has, except me.

Everybody is dying to read what I write at work. Take you, for example. But what you write -- an insightful memo, an urgent email, a game-changing report -- nobody wants to read.

Or so says Aaron Orendorff.

Orendorff is the author of "Your Colleagues Don't Read Anything You Write. Here Are 8 Ways to Change That," a recent article in The New York Times.

A sympathetic soul, Orendorff is quick to assure you that "it's not personal." "We're just inundated," he writes, with a flood of communications. The result is a "wasteland of no response," in which "our words disappear into the ether."

The following are a few tips for making your verbiage irresistible -- just like mine.

 

No. 1: "Write less often."

Pick one or two critical areas, and concentrate your communications on those subjects. For example, instead of emailing your managers that your CFO has just purchased a one-way ticket to the tropical island of Bongo-Bongo, an offshore banking oasis with no extradition treaty, make the subject of your next email an in-depth analysis on the significance of Max cheating with Dayna on "Vanderpump Rules."

Now that's a critical area on which you can concentrate that everyone wants to read.

No. 2: Establish a 24-hour waiting period.

...continued

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