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Solar geoengineering might work, but local temperatures could keep rising for years

Imagine a future where, despite efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions quickly, parts of the world have become unbearably hot. Some governments might decide to “geoengineer” the planet by spraying substances into the upper atmosphere to form fine reflective aerosols – a process known as stratospheric aerosol injection.

...Read more

NASA crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid – photos show the last moments of the successful DART mission

In a world first, NASA has crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid in an attempt to push the rocky traveler off its trajectory. The Double Asteroid Redirection Test – or DART – is meant to test one potential approach that could prevent an asteroid from colliding with Earth. David Barnhart is a professor of astronautics at the University of ...Read more

Two wrongs trying to make a right – makeup calls are common for MLB umpires, financial analysts and probably you

Major League Baseball has been trying something new in recent seasons: instant replay for umpire calls. After replay review, some erroneous calls on the field can be overturned. Baseball in its own fashion is acknowledging what sports fans have always known – officials make mistakes.

The most notable manifestation of this tendency ...Read more

People of color are as interested in buying electric cars as white consumers – the biggest obstacle is access to charging

A nationally representative survey of 8,027 Americans shows that across all racial demographics, overall interest in purchasing electric vehicles is high. Among those surveyed, 33% of white respondents, 38% of Black respondents, 43% of Latinos and 52% of Asian Americans say they would “definitely” or “seriously consider” purchasing or...Read more

Hurricane hunters are flying through Ian's powerful winds to get the forecasts you rely on – here's what happens when the plane plunges into the eyewall of a storm

As Hurricane Ian intensifies on its way toward the Florida coast, hurricane hunters are in the sky doing something almost unimaginable: flying through the center of the storm. With each pass, the scientists aboard these planes take measurements that satellites can’t and send them to forecasters at the National Hurricane Center.

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Dreamstime/Dreamstime/TNS

Editorial: Climate change already torments the poor. It will soon come for the rich

A new study might finally get the attention of industrial leaders and others who have shrugged off the threat of human-caused climate change. It finds that more than half a million privately owned parcels of coastal property — the kind of property generally held by the well-heeled — could be underwater by 2050.

Studies galore lately have ...Read more

Cyberattacks a top concern across all business sizes, economic uncertainty a close second, new survey shows

Cyberattacks are now so common that the majority of businesses responding to a new survey not only viewed them as their top concern but a majority saw a future attack on their organization as inevitable.

An annual survey of businesses by insurance giant Travelers Cos., which underwrites cybersecurity coverage, ranked cyberattacks as the top ...Read more

JIM WATSON/Getty Images North America/TNS

NASA spacecraft rams distant asteroid in test of Earth defense

A NASA spacecraft successfully crashed into an asteroid approximately 6.8 million miles from Earth in a test to determine if the impact can nudge the space rock slightly off course.

NASA launched its DART spacecraft in November 2021 with the express purpose of colliding with an asteroid about the size of a football stadium at 14,000 miles per ...Read more

JIM WATSON/Getty Images North America/TNS

NASA spacecraft rams distant asteroid in test of Earth defense

A NASA spacecraft successfully crashed into an asteroid approximately 7 million miles from Earth in a test to determine if the impact can nudge the space rock slightly off course.

NASA launched its DART spacecraft in November 2021 with the express purpose of colliding with an asteroid about the size of a football stadium at 14,000 miles per ...Read more

Dreamstime/Dreamstime/TNS

NASA spacecraft poised to hit asteroid Monday

A NASA spacecraft is set to collide with an asteroid Monday and the space agency is inviting spectators to watch.

The DART spacecraft, which launched 10 months ago, will hit the rock around 7:14 p.m. Eastern time with a livestream starting on NASA’s website at 6 p.m.

The mission, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, will attempt to deflect ...Read more

3 reasons Hurricane Ian poses a major flooding hazard for Florida – a meteorologist explains

Hurricane Ian strengthened as it headed for Florida and was on track to bring a powerful storm surge and potentially flooding rainfall to most of the state this week.

After a slow start to the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, Ian has ideal conditions. It faces minimal vertical wind shear – the difference in wind speeds and directions...Read more

Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times/TNS

Meet the women hunting giant pythons 'eating everything' in the Everglades

KENDALL, Fla. — Donna Kalil loves snakes. She's been fascinated by them since she was a kid living in the mountains of Venezuela's capital in the 1960s, where her father was stationed as an Air Force pilot.

"We'd play 'I-spy,' and we'd use the snakes, birds and other animals that lived in the jungle," she said. "I developed a really sharp eye...Read more

Children's eyewitness testimony can be as accurate as adults' or more so – if interviewers follow these guidelines

Eyewitness memory has come under a lot of scrutiny in recent years, as organizations such as the Innocence Project suggest it was a key piece of information in as many as 75% of wrongful convictions in the United States. Unfortunately, human memory doesn’t work like a video camera recording a scene, allowing you to play memories back ...Read more

Which wetlands should receive federal protection? The Supreme Court revisits a question it has struggled in the past to answer

The U.S. Supreme Court opens its new session on Oct. 3, 2022, with a high-profile case that could fundamentally alter the federal government’s ability to address water pollution. Sackett v. EPA turns on a question that courts and regulators have struggled to answer for several decades: Which wetlands and bodies of water can the federal ...Read more

Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune/TNS

States take on PFAS 'forever chemicals' with bans, lawsuits

“Forever chemicals” are everywhere. The thousands of chemicals in the group known as perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, are found in cookware, packaging, cosmetics, clothing, carpet, electronics, firefighting foam and many other products.

The chemicals, which do not naturally break down, are so widespread that they’re...Read more

Joshua Roberts/Getty Images North America/TNS

EPA Administrator Regan announces new environmental justice office, $3 billion in funding

WARRENTON, N.C. — Growing up in Goldsboro, Michael Regan heard his parents talk about the 1982 Warren County protests against a PCB landfill, demonstrations that played a pivotal role in establishing the environmental justice movement in the United States.

On Saturday, Regan — now the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection ...Read more

Ivan Burov/Dreamstime/TNS

Report: More than 1,000 wild horses sent to slaughter

The American Wild Horse Campaign released a report Friday documenting that 1,020 federally-protected wild horses and burros have been sold at slaughter auctions in the last 22 months.

The campaign, dedicated to preserving the American wild horses and burros in free-roaming herds, cited records it accumulated through an investigation into the ...Read more

NASA set to ram distant asteroid in bid to avoid future catastrophes on Earth

On Monday evening, a robotic NASA spacecraft is programmed to ram itself into a distant asteroid at 14,000 miles per hour in deep space to demonstrate the agency’s future ability to defend Earth from hazardous space rocks.

It’s a fast action scene straight out of a sci-fi movie: The spacecraft, named DART, will first spot an asteroid the ...Read more

Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS

NASA stands down from Tuesday launch for Artemis I, might roll back

ORLANDO, Fla. — With the approaching threat of what is forecast to be Hurricane Ian, NASA finally threw in the towel for a launch attempt Tuesday of its Artemis I mission to the moon from Kennedy Space Center.

But it held off a decision to roll the massive 5.75-million-pound, 322-foot-tall combination of Space Launch System rocket, mobile ...Read more

Philadelphia tech salaries see biggest jump in the US, growing faster than Silicon Valley

Technology job paychecks grew fastest in Philadelphia this year, according to a new survey of employers and workers by Hired.com.

Philadelphia posted the largest growth in average local tech salaries — a nearly 12% increase from $127,000 in 2021 to $142,000 in 2022 — compared with 15 other large U.S. metro areas, including Silicon Valley....Read more