Health

/

Health & Spirit

Canadians root for an underdog US health policy idea

Shefali Luthra, Kaiser Health News on

Published in Health & Fitness

Canada has its own reasons for seeing potential in this sort of systemic test kitchen.

Health care's growing price tag -- and a payment system that doesn't necessarily reward keeping people healthy -- is hardly just an American problem. The vast majority of Canadian doctors are paid through what Americans call the "fee-for-service" model. And Canadian policymakers are also looking for strategies to curb health care costs -- which, while greater in the United States, are a big budget here, too.

"The whole world is confronting the same issue, which is, 'How do you pay and incentivize doctors to keep people out of the hospital and keep them healthy?'" said Ezekiel Emanuel, a former adviser to President Barack Obama who pushed for the center's initial development. "Different places are looking at how to break out of that system, because everyone knows its perversions. This is one place where ... we are in the world among the most innovative groups."

Emanuel added that he wasn't surprised to hear of the center's appeal in Canada. He has received similar feedback from health ministers in Belgium and France, he said.

Even so, U.S. critics say CMMI's work is a waste of money or a federal overreach.

And, so far, the Trump administration has reduced by half the size of one high-profile Obama administration project that would have bundled payments for hip and knee replacements -- so that the hospitals performing those were paid a set amount, rather than for individual services. It also canceled other scheduled "bundling" projects targeting payment for cardiac care and other joint replacements.

CMS Administrator Seema Verma wrote in The Wall Street Journal in September that the Innovation Center was going to begin moving "in a new direction."

A follow-up "request for information" from the federal government suggested that the center would emphasize cutting health care costs through strategies like market competition, eliminating fraud and helping consumers actually shop for care. It also suggested the Innovation Center would favor smaller-scale projects.

At least for now, it's hard to interpret what this means, said Jack Hoadley, a health policy analyst at Georgetown University who has previously worked at the Department of Health and Human Services.

 

Limiting CMMI's footprint would be problematic, Emanuel argued, while discussing CMMI's status in the U.S.

The footprint in Canada, though, seems to be growing.

"We definitely looked to it as a model as something we can do. Like, look, this happened, and why can't we do the same thing here?" said Dr. Tara Kiran, a Toronto-based primary care doctor who also researches health care quality.

(Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.)

(c)2017 Kaiser Health News

Visit Kaiser Health News at www.khn.org

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

 

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus