Senior Living

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Health & Spirit

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ArcaMax

Social Security Q&A: Can I apply for benefits online?

Q: My neighbor said he applied for Social Security retirement benefits online. Can you really apply for retirement without traveling to an office?

A: Yes, you can! And, what's more exciting, it's the easiest, fastest, and most convenient way to apply for retirement benefits. Our secure website makes it simple, allowing you to apply for ...Read more

Social Security and You: More About Maximizing Strategies

As I've said many times before, there is no single Social Security topic I hear about more often than the current craze to maximize one's Social Security benefits. Easily, 75 percent of the emails I get deal with this one issue alone.

And this week, I received a couple emails that distressed me. They came from folks who have gone to their local...Read more

Retire, and then back to work

More people go back to work after retirement to stay involved and feel more youthful

Sandy Jenkins had worked for years as executive secretary to the associate director of the FDIC in Dallas and retired in 1997 with "a nice savings."

She spent the next couple of years "bouncing around the country" to visit various family members in ...Read more

The News Tribune (Tacoma, Wash.) Larry LaRue column

One of Candy Johnson's last jobs was at a child care center, where she bent over one day to pick up a baby and hurt her back so badly she saw stars.

When Johnson retired shortly thereafter, she was 62 years old and filed for disability. She didn't get it. And soon she found herself in the minefield that the Pierce County Aging and ...Read more

Double job loss disrupts a family's smooth financial path

For Victor and Shannon Macias, the good old days were as recent as 2012, when the couple could afford to take their two daughters to Disneyland or out to dinner without worrying about the bill.

But after both were laid off from their jobs, family entertainment became staying home and watching a movie or heading to the local park for some ...Read more

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Patricia Sheridan's Breakfast With ... Sharon Epperson

Award-winning journalist and author Sharon Epperson graduated from Taylor Allderdice High School and went on to Harvard University and Columbia University for a master's degree in international affairs. She is currently senior energy and personal finance correspondent for .

I was wondering how you went from majoring in sociology and ...Read more

'Driving force' to retire ... sort of

LEWISTON -- The eve of the Business-to-Business trade show finds Lucien Gosselin in a pensive mood.

By now, of course, almost everyone has heard that Gosselin will retire as president of the Lewiston-Auburn Economic Growth Council at the end of June. Surely, this will be the talk of the trade show; which, by the way, Gosselin founded.

At ...Read more

Veterans deal with financial learning curve

When he retired from the Marine Corps in May and became a manager for a defense contractor, Col. Mark Desens knew he was entering new territory in many ways.

In corporate America, everything from resumes to management styles is different, he said. Personal finances, especially, require some homework.

"I'm really fortunate to have a pension...Read more

Labor market flooded by seniors, data shows

Saul Markowitz could not be happier about his most recent hire.

The president of Markowitz Communications often hires his former interns, who tend to stay a couple of years before moving on to other career opportunities. In March, though, he and his wife, Bonnie, the company's vice president, made a different call.

Mr. Markowitz had known ...Read more

Mahanoy Area fair promotes financial literacy in all aspects of life

MAHANOY CITY -- If someone needed information on finances involving investments, careers, legal matters and more, the second Mahanoy Area Community Financial Fair was the place to be Wednesday.

The mission of the three-hour fair was to promote financial literacy involving not only banking and investing, but also many other areas of people's...Read more

Retirement: pushing the pause/restart buttons

Working past 66 may not be everyone's idea of a dream "retirement," but for many baby-boomers, it could represent the future. A 2013 Wells Fargo survey showed that one-third of respondents expect to work until "at least 80" for lack of retirement savings. A steady paycheck means you have more time to save, and the nest egg you've accumulated...Read more

Work longer and prosper

During his 26 years at a packaging company in Charlotte, N.C., Pat Baines climbed the ladder to become plant manager and then a vice-president. Along the way, he and his wife, Bonnie, put their two sons through college and paid for one to go to grad school. When a new company took over and asked Pat to transfer to a job in California, he ...Read more

As more seniors gamble for fun, some are finding only trouble

After skipping doctor's appointments for months, Gina's father was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer in January. That's when she realized he had other problems, too.

While helping arrange her dad's medical care, Gina obtained power of attorney to manage his finances during his hospitalization and recovery. Gina's full name is not being used to ...Read more

a silver lining

Eight months ago, Malti Kumar, a sprightly 68-year-old, rented out part of her quaint Faridabad bungalow, packed up a lifetime of possessions and moved to The Golden Estate retirement resort nearby.

There, she has the company of other seniors in the 75 independent, serviced rental homes, and the comfort of round-the-clock maintenance, ...Read more

Retirement: Starting a business you love

Geri Messer and Pat Balderas of Toledo, Ohio, didn't plan to spend their retirement managing a business. But an opportunity fell into their laps -- or more accurately, at their feet -- when the owner of the dance studio where they took lessons said she wanted to sell it.

Messer and Balderas, both 66, were united by their love of tap ...Read more

Starting a new career in midlife

It's a midlife conundrum that's becoming increasingly common: You're not ready to retire, but you're tired of what you're doing. Enter the second-act career. These encore occupations offer a chance to pursue a lifelong passion, start a business or make a difference in your community. Often, second careers aren't as lucrative or prestigious ...Read more

More grandparents serving as primary caregivers to children

As American parents have grappled with financial peril and other woes over the last decade, grandparents have stepped in to help. Grandparents were the main caregivers for more than 3 million children in 2011 -- a 20% increase from the turn of the millennium, the Pew Research Center reported Wednesday.

The numbers surged during the economic...Read more

Commentary: Building a pre-retirement nest

My husband and I paid our annual visit to the financial adviser who watches over our undoubtedly inadequate retirement savings, an appointment that is not unlike those with the dentist: necessary but never fun.

During our meeting, I proudly listed the home maintenance projects I had undertaken as our retirement approaches - painting the ...Read more

Retirement: Time for Plan B

Want to execute the perfect retirement plan? Live the perfect life. In this existence, you would never lose your job, and recessions would never happen.

In my case, I wouldn't be getting a divorce -- and splitting the retirement savings, pensions and home equity my husband and I acquired over a three-decades-plus marriage. Now, those ...Read more

Food stamp program under fire

WASHINGTON -- The odds of winning one of Michigan's high-stakes lottery games are 1 in 10,000, but the probability of two people hitting million-dollar jackpots and still be collecting food stamps has to be even more remote. Yet that is exactly what happened in Michigan, stoking a nationwide debate over whether the program is becoming an out...Read more