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Are You A-Where of These Regional Terms?

Rob Kyff on

G. A tract of low-lying land, especially along a river.

H. A porch or staircase at the entrance to a building.

I. A wooden stake.

J. A rubber band.

Answers (with help from the fascinating Regional Notes in the American Heritage Dictionary):

1. Intervale: G. New England. A village on flat land along the Saco River in northern New Hampshire is actually named Intervale.

 

2. Tumbleset: C. South. "Set" is a variant of the French "sault," from the Latin "saltus" (a leap), hence, "tumble leap."

3. Stateside: D. Alaska. "Stateside," often used by Americans abroad to describe their home country, is also an Alaskan term for the Lower 48.

4. Stob: I. South. "Stob" is a variant of "stub"; both derive from the Middle English "stubbe," a tree stump.

5. Mozo: F. Southwest. Spanish for "young man," "mozo" originally denoted an extra hand on a cattle roundup or ranch; it has evolved into a general term for an assistant or helper.

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