Chess Puzzles / Games

Black to Play

by Pete Tamburro
Black to Play

If you have been following this column for a while, you should remember the two things you should always be on the lookout for!

Solution:

It’s an interesting and instructive game, so here’s the whole thing for you serious students of chess:) Popov,Vladimir - Riumin,Nikolay Nikolaevich Moscow-ch 10th Moscow , 1929

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qb3 c5! 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.e3 0–0 7.Be2 b6 8.0–0 Bb7 9.Nb5?! d5 [9...Na5!? 10.Qd1 cxd4] 10.a3 Ba5 11.Rd1 a6 12.cxd5 exd5 13.Nc3 c4! 14.Qc2 b5 15.b4 Bc7 16.e4?! dxe4 17.Nxe4 Nxe4 18.Qxe4 Re8 19.Qc2 Qd6‚ 20.g3 [ Also instructive is: 20.Bb2? Nxb4 21.axb4 Bxf3 22.Bxf3 Qxh2+ 23.Kf1 Qh1#] 20...Qd5 21.Be3 h6 22.Qd2 Re6 23.Re1 Rf6 24.Kg2? Kh7 25.Qc2+ g6 26.Qd2

See Diagram

26… Rxf3! 27.Bxf3 Qxf3+ 28.Kxf3 Nxd4+ 29.Kg4 Bc8+ 30.Kh4 Nf3#

You can’t ask much more than this from a chess position continuation: rook sacrifice, queen sacrifice, double check, backwards moving bishop check and final mate with a knight. Wow! It just shows you what can happen when you draw a king into the open and remember that advice about looking at all checks and captures (and forced moves)!

Send questions and comments to PTamburro@aol.com.




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