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4 Top Tips to Organize Kids' Clothing

Jennifer Bright on

Never since pregnancy have I felt such a compulsion to organize. Nesting during pregnancy is normal. Nesting during a pandemic? From what I hear from my friends, that must be pretty normal, too.

I have clothing since Bush was president -- and that's George H.W. Bush. Maybe even before. So, my clothes stay pretty organized.

But babies and kids outgrow clothing quicker than you can say, "OshKosh B'gosh." Keeping clothing neat, orderly and accessible is practically a full-time job.

Here's how our Mommy M.D.s -- doctors who are also mothers -- keep their kids' clothes neat.

"My twins shared a room when they were babies," says Jennifer Gilbert, D.O., a mom of twins and OB-GYN at Paoli Hospital in Pennsylvania. "I hung up most of their clothing because that made it easier for me to see at a glance what I had. I hung my son's clothing on the left side of the closet and my daughter's clothing on the right. I stashed their pajamas in drawers, though, and I put all of their socks in baskets -- blue for my son and pink for my daughter."

"We were fortunate to inherit a lot of beautiful clothes from my brother and his wife, who have two young daughters," says Rachel Rohde, M.D., a mom of a daughter and a son, an associate professor at the Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, and a partner in Michigan Orthopaedic Surgeons in Southfield, Michigan. "I actually used the boxes from our wedding china to separate clothes by sizes -- newborn, 3, 6 and 9 months. I stored the boxes in my daughter's closet and packed and unpacked the clothes into and out of her dresser drawers as she grew. When my daughter was born, she was already too big for many of the clothes that she received as gifts, so we exchanged new outfits that were too small."

"My husband and I didn't find out that we were having a girl until our baby was born," says Jennifer Bacani McKenney, M.D., a mom of two and a family physician in Fredonia, Kansas. "Once we announced that to our friends and family, they started to bring us all of these baby clothes. People love buying baby clothes, so they keep on coming! About a week after our daughter was born, my husband and I bought a bunch of plastic storage containers at Walmart. We put all of our daughter's 3- to 6-month clothes into one bin, the 6- to 9-month clothes into another bin and so on. We put all of the bins into our daughter's closet. As our daughter outgrew a size of clothes, we put them back into a bin. Then we put that bin in the basement. It's amazing how quickly babies outgrow the small sizes!"

 

Dr. Rallie's Tips

"Organization is definitely not my strong suit, and I've always struggled to keep closets, drawers and shelves neat and tidy. My two youngest sons were born just 13 months apart, so I had lots of little outfits to wash, fold and organize when they were babies and toddlers. I started out using a chest of drawers to hold all of their clothes, but I found that when I put everything in drawers, my boys ended up wearing the same three or four outfits over and over. My husband and I would just grab the outfit on top of the stack (or crumpled pile) of clothes, and the outfits at the bottom of the drawers never saw the light of day. With this 'system,' my boys were outgrowing a lot of their clothes before they ever wore them!

"I finally figured out that it worked better for us to hang most of their clothes in their closet. That way, when I opened the closet door, I could see most of their outfits at a glance. I used the dresser drawers for smaller items, such as socks, shorts, T-shirts, hats and mittens. I also found that it was easiest for me to organize my sons' clothes if I washed them in a separate load of laundry. It was just too easy for those teeny-tiny baby socks to get lost in the sleeves of my husband's flannel shirts or in the legs of my fuzzy pajama pants." -- Rallie McAllister, M.D., M.P.H., mom of three, co-author of "The Mommy MD Guide to Your Baby's First Year," nationally recognized health expert and family physician in Lexington, Kentucky.

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Jennifer Bright is a mom of four sons, co-founder and CEO of family- and veteran- owned custom publisher Momosa Publishing, co-founder of the Mommy MD Guides team of 150+ mommy M.D.s, and co-author of "The Mommy MD Guide to the Toddler Years." She lives in Hellertown, Pennsylvania. To find out more about Jennifer Bright and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

Copyright 2020 Creators Syndicate Inc.
 

 

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