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Sixers' Mike Scott calls NBA jersey phrases “a bad list, a bad choice”

Keith Pompey, The Philadelphia Inquirer on

Published in Basketball

PHILADELPHIA -- Mike Scott called it a bad list.

The 76ers reserve forward brought one of the NBA's plans using his platform in the Orlando restart to bring awareness to social issues.

"They have us some names and phrases to put on the back of our jerseys. That was terrible," he said during Monday's Zoom call with reporters. "It was a just a bad list, a bad choice. They didn't give players a chance to voice their opinion on them. They just gave us a list to pick from.

"So that was bad. That was terrible."

Scott said voicing your opinion to how you feel is a way to use your their platform. He added voting and seeing what laws can be changed are other ways.

"But I'm all about just doing instead of just saying or posting or putting someone on the back of your jersey," Scott said. "I don't think that's going to stop anything."

On Friday, the Undefeated reported that the NBA and National Basketball Players Association agreed to a list of social-justice messages players can wear on their back of their jerseys during the 22-team NBA restart at Walt Disney World. The list of names includes: Black Lives Matter; Say Their Names; Vote; I Can't Breathe; Justice; Peace; Power to the People; Justice Now; Say Her Name; Si Se Puede (Yes We Can); See Us; Hear Us; Respect Us; Love Us; Liberation; Listen; Listen To Us; Stand Up; Ally; Anti-Racist; I Am A Man; Speak Up; How Many More; Group Economic; Education Reform; and Mentor.

Josh Richardson thinks the list came from a place of good intention.

"But I think it's tough to try to limit what people are feeling, and how people can speak out to just a list of 15 to 20 sayings," the Sixers shooting guard said. "There's a lot of different things that are being thought, a lot of different things that are wanting to be portrayed.

If it's not in that list of words that they gave us, it's like it doesn't count as much. So I can see where (Scott) comes from with that."

George Floyd's death, and overall racial inequities and social injustices that have been highlighted in recent weeks have brought out some emotions in Scott.

 

"You know a lot of anger, disappointment, just you know just questioning a lot of stuff like what's going on in this world and how can people be so evil," he said. "You know, there's just a lot of anger. It's mostly just anger."

A lot of NBA players have been vocal as way to use their platform as way to make a chance. Scott takes a more reserved, lad back and a "more of let's just do it instead of talking about it" approach.

He's still angry and admits that it's not easy to change his focus from the coronavirus and racism to playing basketball in Orlando.

"Most people would probably be like, 'This (stuff) should be easy. Just think about basketball.'

"But I don't know, man. It's tough thinking about that after what's gone on these past couple of months."

He's been dealing with that while trying work out every day and get mentally ready for Orlando.

"But at the same time, how can you not focus on everything else going on?" he said.

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