From the Right

/

Politics

Can we coexist with Asia's communists?

Patrick Buchanan on

Wednesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met for seven hours at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii with the chief architect of China's foreign policy, Yang Jiechi.

The two had much to talk about.

As The Washington Post reports, the "bitterly contentious relationship" between our two countries has "reached the lowest point in almost half a century." Not since Nixon went to China have relations been so bad.

Early this week, Chinese and Indian soldiers fought with rocks, sticks and clubs along the Himalayan truce line that dates back to their 1962 war. Twenty Indian soldiers died, some pushed over a cliff into a freezing river in the highest-casualty battle between the Asian giants in decades.

Among the issues surely raised with Pompeo by the Chinese is the growing bipartisan vilification of China and its ruling Communist Party by U.S. politicians the closer we come to November.

The U.S. has been putting China in the dock for concealing information on the coronavirus virus until it had spread, lying about it, and then letting Wuhan residents travel to the outside world while quarantining them inside China.

 

In America, it has become good politics to be tough on China.

The reasons are many.

High among them are the huge trade deficits with China that led to an historic deindustrialization of America, China's emergence as the world's first industrial power, and a U.S. dependency on Chinese imports for the vital necessities of our national life.

Then there is the systematic theft of intellectual property from U.S. companies in China and Beijing's deployment of thousands of student-spies into U.S. colleges and universities to steal security secrets.

...continued

swipe to next page
Copyright 2020 Creators Syndicate Inc.
 

 

Comics

Ed Gamble Mike Peters Paul Szep Chris Britt John Deering Al Goodwyn