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More parents exploring homeschooling may be shutdown's silver lining

John Stossel on

Even though they are more likely to be poor, "Home-schoolers score 30% higher on SAT tests." They also do better in college, and they are less likely to drink or do drugs.

"Mass home schooling during this pandemic," says DeAngelis, "may actually be a blessing."

Debbie Dabin, a mom in Utah, is one of many parents who started home schooling this spring and now is "definitely considering home schooling" next year.

Dabin bought teaching materials over the internet from a company called "The Good and the Beautiful." Her son likes the lessons better than what he got in school. "It's great," Dabin says. "He likes the activities; he wants to do them."

Before the pandemic, he'd told his mom he hated school.

I hated school, too. Classes were boring. Listening to lectures is a poor way to learn, and unnecessary today.

 

In addition to home-school teaching programs, there are also free internet games that teach things like math, reading and writing, while customizing the speed of lessons to each learner's needs.

Sites like Education.com teach math by letting kids adjust pizza toppings.

For older kids, YouTube channels like TED-Ed and Khan Academy offer "free educational videos from the world's foremost experts on civics, history, mathematics," adds DeAngelis.

"Not good enough!" say "experts."

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Copyright 2020 Creators Syndicate, Inc.
 

 

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