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Black is a color, not a culture, and capitalizing it is drivel

Dennis Prager on

A few months ago, I noticed that my published column spelled "black" "Black." As I had submitted the column with "black" spelled with a lower case "b," I contacted my editor to find out why what I had written was changed. She responded that the syndicate was following the Associated Press' rules of style, a common practice in journalism and book writing.

On July 20, 2020, the AP published "Explaining AP style on Black and white," in which it explained:

"AP's style is now to capitalize Black in a racial, ethnic or cultural sense, conveying an essential and shared sense of history, identity and community among people who identify as Black, including those in the African diaspora and within Africa. The lowercase black is a color, not a person. AP style will continue to lowercase the term white in racial, ethnic and cultural senses."

The AP explanation is drivel.

There is no "shared sense of history, identity and community among people who identify as Black, including those in the African diaspora and within Africa."

Only left-wingers believe such nonsense. Not only is there no shared culture or sense of identity that unites blacks outside and inside Africa, but there is also no shared culture among blacks in Africa and none among blacks outside of Africa ("the African diaspora"). The only thing all blacks have in common is geographic origin (but since it is said that we all emanate from Africa, that means little) and color.

 

Historically, the only identity Africans shared with other Africans was a tribal identity. That is why (black) Hutus could perpetrate the most concentrated mass murder since the Holocaust against (black) Tutsis. That is why black Africans were indispensable to the transatlantic slave trade. Those who rounded up other Africans to sell to Europeans felt no moral obligation, let alone a "shared identity," with the Africans they sold.

What does a black raised in the Bronx have in common with a black raised in Cameroon? The answer is: nothing. They have as little in common as a white from the Bronx and a black from Cameroon.

What does a Brazilian black have in common with a black from Chicago or a black from Uganda? Nothing.

Does Sen. Kamala Harris, the California daughter of a black and an (Asian) Indian, have more in common with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi or with a tribal chief in Togo? Or, for that matter, more in common with white Pelosi or black Candace Owens or black Larry Elder?

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