From the Left

/

Politics

A year with Trump

By Robert B. Reich, Tribune Content Agency on

Last week, Utah Senator Orrin Hatch stood on the White House lawn, opining that Donald Trump's presidency could be "the greatest presidency that we've seen, not only in generations, but maybe ever."

I beg to differ.

America has had its share of crooks (Warren G. Harding, Richard Nixon), bigots (Andrew Jackson, James Buchanan) and incompetents (Andrew Johnson, George W. Bush). But never before Donald Trump have we had a president who combined all of these nefarious qualities.

America's great good fortune was to begin with the opposite -- a superb moral leader. By June of 1775, when Congress appointed George Washington to command the nation's army, he had already "become a moral rallying post," as his biographer, Douglas Southall Freeman, described him, "the embodiment of the purpose, the patience and the determination necessary for the triumph of the revolutionary cause."

Washington won the war and then led the fledgling nation "by directness, by deference, and by manifest dedication to duty."

Some 240 years later, in the presidential campaign of 2016, candidate Trump was accused of failing to pay his income taxes. His response was "that makes me smart" -- thereby signaling to millions of Americans that paying taxes in full is not an obligation of citizenship.

 

Trump also boasted about giving money to politicians so they would do whatever he wanted. "When they call, I give. And you know what, when I need something from them two years later, three years later, I call them. They are there for me." In other words, it's perfectly OK for business leaders to pay off politicians, regardless of the effect on our democracy.

Trump sent another message by refusing to release his tax returns during the campaign or even after he took office, or to put his businesses into a blind trust to avoid conflicts of interest, and by his overt willingness to make money off his presidency by having foreign diplomats stay at his Washington hotel, and by promoting his various golf clubs.

These were not just ethical lapses. They directly undermined the common good by reducing the public's trust in the office of the president. As the New York Times editorial board put it in June 2017, "for Mr. Trump and his circle, what matters is not what's right but what you can get away with. In his White House, if you're avoiding the appearance of impropriety, you're not pushing the boundaries hard enough."

A president's most fundamental legal and moral responsibility is to uphold and protect our system of government. Trump has degraded that system.

...continued

swipe to next page
 

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus
 

Social Connections

Comics

Chris Britt Steve Benson Ken Catalino Clay Bennett Gary Varvel Michael Ramirez