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A parent's guide to the PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X and Series S

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Published in Science & Technology News

This holiday season, video games are undoubtedly going to be on a lot of wish lists making their way to Santa Claus. Video games have been particularly popular this year, likely thanks in large part to worldwide efforts to stay inside, and Microsoft and Sony are both releasing brand new consoles in attempt to get your attention — and your money.

If you're a parent that doesn't know much about video games yourself, the idea of buying into a new video game console can be daunting. Is it really OK for your child's age? Can you monitor what your family is playing? Will the games you already own work on the new hardware?

Here are simple answers to some of the most common questions you might have.

WHAT'S WITH ALL THESE NEW MODELS OF SYSTEMS? WHAT DO I NEED?

Microsoft has just released their latest iteration of the Xbox, while Sony just came out with the PlayStation 5. Both console lines come in two different flavors this year, which could spark confusion if you don't go to the store prepared.

All four console varieties boast lightning-fast load times and enough power to carry us through many upcoming years of groundbreaking video games.

 

The PlayStation 5 is a $500 system with a disc drive, which will allow you to play games physical games that you buy on disc as well as watch DVDs and Blu-rays.

The PlayStation 5 Digital Edition is a $400 system without a disc drive. It can play all of the same games and has all the same features, but you cannot buy a PS5 game off the shelf at Walmart and expect to play it on this console. You have to buy everything digitally, direct from Sony.

The Xbox Series X is a $500 system with a disc drive and 1TB of internal storage for holding games. It's a powerful console that can play games in 4K and at 60 frames per second. You can use the disc drive to play physical games as well as watch movies.

The Xbox Series S, at $300, is the most affordable of the new consoles, but it has the most compromises. The Series S does not have a disc-drive and is digital-only, it has 512GB of internal storage, and it cannot play games at 4K.

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