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Answer Angel: Huggies aren’t just diapers anymore

Ellen Warren, Tribune News Service on

Published in Fashion Daily News

Dear Answer Angel Ellen: I recently got an unsolicited email in my inbox with one word in the subject line: “Huggies!” I thought maybe the sender had me confused — perhaps with a new mother? The only thing I knew abut Huggies was that’s a name for disposable diapers. But the text described “timeless and trendy huggies that are sure to up your earscape game.” What is this about and what is an “earscape?”

— Olivia M.

Dear Olivia: I too was puzzled when, reading a fashion magazine, I saw that the model’s “huggies” were mentioned in the fine print caption. I’ve since learned that huggies are small hoop earrings that hug the earlobe. In other words, they do not hang below the lobe like many hoop earrings. What’s the big deal? Some find them more comfortable for talking on the phone (and sleeping), and if your pierced ear hole is enlarged from years of phone calling (mine are), they can prevent further drag and, sometimes, conceal the extended (unsightly) hole. (You can also get huggies for unpierced ears.)

As for the earscape — that’s a made-up word to describe the ear area which men and women with multiple piercings decorate with a changing array of small earrings.

Dear Answer Angel Ellen: I see pictures in magazines and ads of women doing a “French tuck” with their shirts. When I try to duplicate the style, I look sloppy and like I forgot to tuck my shirt in all the way. What’s the secret to making a French tuck look effortless and “right?”

— Amy G.

Dear Amy: You’re not alone in thinking the French tuck is a sloppy look. Basically, it is tucking in our shirt halfway — usually leaving the back and, perhaps, one or both sides untucked. I’d never heard of it until I saw stylist Tan France on the Netflix show “Queer Eye” promoting it. The internet and YouTube are filled with how-tos and videos on “mastering” the look. But … some of us old-school types agree that this is an unmade bed look. A half-measure for those who want to give it a try: Tuck your shirt in normally, then yank it out a bit to blouse it slightly over your waistband. The added benefit of blousing your shirt is it can conceal a bit of blub visible over your waistband if the shirt is tucked in tightly.

 

Angelic Readers

There were many recommendations for the reader who asked for help finding products for the woman who complained about her very fine, thin hair. Daria M. writes, “Two products I have used for the past several years are standouts. Both are R + Co. I use the Dallas Thickening Spray (randco.com, amazon.com, $29) and the Rodeo Star Thickening Style Foam (mousse) (randco.com, $32).They are not cheap but they work really well, you don’t need to use a lot of product, plus they smell great! Susan E., a hairstylist for 48 years who has fine hair, favors Rusk Volumizing Mousse (amazon.com, $18).

Marcia M. uses Redken Stay High 18 but it recently was discontinued. The manufacturer recommends Redken Guts 10 Volume Spray Foam as a substitute: (ulta.com, $21; amazon.com, $19.95). Anita W. writes that Oribe’s Grandiose Hair Plumping Mousse resolved her flat, thin hair woes (oribe.com, amazon.com, $39).

Reader Rant

From Barbara E.: “Fabric prints. They’re all awful! Whether it be a darling dress design, attractive style of tops, and /or especially bathing suits! UGLY floral prints and patterns are hideous! I want to spend my money on attractive and striking attire as I once did. It’s virtually impossible!”

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