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Q&A: Talking God, science and religion with theoretical physicist Frank Wilczek

Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times on

Published in Religious News

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Do you consider yourself an atheist, agnostic? Do you have a definition you're comfortable with?

Not affiliated with any specific recognized church is certainly part of it, but I'm more comfortable saying that I'm a pantheist. I believe that the whole world is sacred and we should take a reverential attitude toward it.

Are science and religion in conflict with each other?

No, they are not in conflict with each other. There have been problems when religions make claims about how the world works or how things got to be the way they are that science comes to make seem incredible. For me, it's very hard to resist the methods of science which are based on the accumulation of evidence.

On the other hand, science itself leads to the deep principle of complementarity, which means to answer different kinds of questions you may need different kinds of approaches that may be mutually incomprehensible or even superficially contradictory.

 

You've written that "in studying how the world works, we are studying how God works, and thereby learning what God is." So, what do you think God is?

Let me lead into that by talking about two of the greatest figures in physics and their very different views of what God is. Sir Isaac Newton was very much a believing Christian and probably devoted as much time to studying Scriptures and theology as he did to physics and mathematics.

Einstein, on the other hand, often talked about God — sometimes he used that word, sometimes he said "the old one" — but his concept was much different. When he was asked seriously what he meant by that, he said he believed in the God of Spinoza, who identified God with reality, with God's work.

That was Einstein's view and that is very much closer to my spirit. I would only add to that that I think God is not only the world as it is, but the world as it should be. So, to me, God is under construction. My concept of God is really based on what I learn about the nature of reality.

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