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A stroke of good luck -- if you drink tea or coffee

By Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D. on

The 2021 women's U.S. rowing teams include powerhouses Charlotte Buck, Kendall Chase and Olivia Coffee and single sculler Kara Kohler. If they have a stroke of good luck, they will do better on the world stage than U.S. rowers did in Tokyo. There, for the first time ever, not a single U.S. crew (male or female) who participated in the Olympic regatta came home with a medal around their necks.

Your stroke of good luck is easier to seize. (It's right in your cupboard.) According to data culled (not sculled) from more than 365,000 participants in the U.K. Biobank who were followed for 10-14 years, people who drink two to three cups of coffee, three to five cups of tea, or a combo of four to six cups of tea and coffee, daily slash their risk for stroke and related dementia. The combo of drinking two to three cups of coffee and two to three cups of tea daily actually lowered the risk of stroke by 32%, compared to folks who don't drink either beverage.

Our advice: Always drink filtered coffee -- drip without a filter and French press can raise your lousy LDL cholesterol levels, and that can up the risk of stroke. Make sure to drink it black or with just a touch of nonfat dairy or oat or soy milk. For tea: Green tea is heart- and brain-friendly; jasmine may protect your heart from stress; and hibiscus tea is also linked to heart health.

Health pioneer Michael Roizen, M.D., is chief wellness officer emeritus at the Cleveland Clinic and author of "What to Eat When" and its companion cookbook.

 

(c)2021 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D.

Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

(c) 2021 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
 

 

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