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Warren has many plans, but on health care, she's with Bernie

Sahil Kapur, Bloomberg News on

Published in Health & Fitness

WASHINGTON -- Elizabeth Warren has a plan for everything -- but on the crucial 2020 issue of health care, she's borrowing from a rival and fellow progressive -- Bernie Sanders.

The presidential candidate who made a mark with her signature "I have a plan for that!" is the only one of the five top-polling Democrats without a sweeping proposal of her own to remake the health care system. She has instead championed Sanders' legislation to replace private insurance by putting every American in an expanded Medicare program.

"I'm with Bernie on Medicare for all," Warren said recently in New Hampshire when asked if she'd devise a blueprint of her own. "Health care is a basic human right. We need to make sure that everybody is covered at the lowest possible cost, and draining money out for health insurance companies to make a lot of profits, by saying no."

Warren's deference to a rival is unusual for a candidate who has styled herself as the policy wonk with a program for everything from cradle to grave. It has allowed her to attract many liberal voters who supported Sanders in 2016, leading her to a dead heat with former vice president Joe Biden for the top spot in the Democratic field. And if Sanders were to eventually drop out of the race before Warren, her embrace of his most popular plan could keep his supporters in her camp.

Sean McElwee, a left-wing activist and researcher with Data For Progress, said that Warren cannot afford to go soft on Medicare for all.

"It's the best option for the campaign to stay in alignment with Sanders on health care through the general election," he said. "These Sanders voters have the highest risk of voting third party or staying home, and you have to keep them mobilized."

 

Weeks before Warren, a Massachusetts senator, announced that she was exploring a presidential run last December, she sounded less wedded to the Sanders proposal, describing a three-step approach to health care.

"Our first job is to defend the Affordable Care Act. Our second is to improve it and make changes, for example to families' vulnerability to the impact of high-priced drugs," she told Bloomberg News. "And the third is to find a system of Medicare available to all that will increase the qualify of care while it decreases the cost of all of us."

As Warren was rising in the polls, her allies began to pick up signals that Sanders supporters were questioning her commitment to progressive ideas. Since June, Warren has given them little ammunition to claim she's going soft on Medicare for all, a defining issue for many left-wing voters.

"The biggest concern Warren has from the left is this idea that, at the end of the day, Sanders is the one true progressive," McElwee said. "If your main issue is Medicare for all, and that's a central tenet of your politics, Warren probably can't win you. But she doesn't want you to hate her. She wants to be your fallback option."

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