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The (Possibly) Best and Worst Countries To Get Caught With Pot

By Benzinga Staff Writer, The Fresh Toast on

Published in Cannabis Daily

Death and long sentences aren’t the only parameters worth considering. Even short stints in harsh prisons can result in severe punishment.

By Andrew Ward

Returning to world travel and current events has recently brought cannabis travel back into the spotlight. People are traveling again despite ongoing COVID-19 worries and increasing Moneypox cases.

At the same time, the 9-year sentence of WNBA star Brittney Griner in a Russian court for two cannabis cartridges sparked outrage and worries about traveling with pot.

Griner’s case closely resembles Marc Fogel’s, who was sentenced to 14 years in a Russian prison in June. Fogel was found in possession of less than one ounce of medical cannabis at a Russian airport. He claimed to be unaware that medical cannabis was illegal in the country.

No matter the person or country, it’s wise to be aware of the local cannabis laws and the nation’s approach to policing, even as cannabis acceptance grows. The World Warming On Weed A September 2021 global cannabis growth report released by New Frontier Data found that 70 countries have legalized or decriminalized cannabis in some form.

 

In North America, Canada has approved adult use, the United States has state-by-state legality and Mexico’s Supreme Court legalized cannabis, but a marketplace hasn’t been established. Meanwhile, the Caribbean is starting to see its first signs of access to medical reform.

South America has seen a wave of reform, with various nations allowing low- or high-potency medical access. Several countries in central and northern South America and Central America prohibit cannabis in all forms.

Africa remains largely prohibitive of cannabis. However, a handful of nations have legalized low-THC medical access. Like Mexico, South Africa’s court legalized cannabis, but a marketplace has not been established.

Most of Oceania remains opposed to cannabis in all forms. However, a few nations and US island territories have taken action on medical or adult use. Australia and New Zealand have medical cannabis laws, with the latter losing a narrow adult use ballot initiative in 2020.

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