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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Continuing our theme week, we have David Bronstein upending Viktor Korchnoi way back in 1962.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

I feel obliged to cite D.J. Morgan in British Chess Magazine from 1968 in having picked these puzzles we’ll be looking at. He did a “Quotes and Queries” section that would many times offer examples of themes. You will probably figure out the theme after today, or at least by tomorrow. This position is from Bronstein-Goldenov, Kiev, 1944.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Black is lost, being the exchange down, but in Maric-Glilgoric, Belgrade, 1962, Gligoric came up with a game winning move. What was it?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A delightful mate in 4 to end the week. There are lots of mates in 5, but only one mate in 4!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

White has sacrificed two pieces to get the Black king into the open. What is the most efficient way to finish him off?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This game, Kofman-Filatov, 1962, reached the diagram position. What move did White play to win the game?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

The following game, which leads to the diagrammed position, has been played at least a half-dozen times in chess history. It starts out 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. f3 dxe4 4. fxe4 e5 5. Nf3 exd4 6. Bc4 Bb4+ 7. c3 dxc3(Better, though not promising was 7... Ba5 8. b4 Bb6 9. cxd4)

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Richard Reti was famous for his endgame compositions. Here, over the board, he comes up with a plan worthy of a study against the great rook and pawn endgame grandmaster Akiba Rubinstein.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

White’s sins in this game lie on a1, b1, f1, g1 and h1. Black punishes White for his transgressions by mating him in seven moves in Rhode v. VonZeitzewitz.

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

The great Adolf Anderssen resigned as Black in this position against Kieseritzky, yet he could draw from this position. What did he miss?

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A question for you: Is Black, on the move, winning or losing or drawing this game?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

The winner of this game missed a spectacular way to finish the game. He did win, but probably would have loved to had played….what?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

A sly move here.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

I first became fascinated with chess around age 7, watching my dad and uncle play. The piece that intrigued me then, and still does, was the knight. This is from a game Malevskaya-Kirlenko, USSR, 1974. It is and ode to the power of the knight.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Another old favorite: White to Play and Mate in Four. It appeared in British Chess Magazine in 1904.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

An old favorite: White to Play and CHECK in Two Moves. No mate, just check.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Tactical Awareness Week: Euwe-Flohr, 1932. Actually, there are several solutions. Are you aware of all the possibilities?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Tactical Awareness Week: Starting off with Reshevsky-Simonson, 1938.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Our last Troitzky lesson for the week. All very practical rook and pawn endings as is this one, which has many more variations.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s another Troitzky composition with a valuable lesson useful for practical play. From a 1910 Deutsche Schachzeitung issue.

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