Entertainment

/

ArcaMax

Former President Jimmy Carter is now the third-oldest winner in Grammys history

Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times on

Published in Entertainment News

Former President Jimmy Carter, who won in the spoken word category for the audio recording of his latest book, "Faith: A Journey for All," will walk away from Sunday's Grammy Awards ranking No. 3 on the list of the oldest winners in Grammy history.

Comedian George Burns was 95 when he collected his only Grammy in 1991 for the spoken word performance of his book "Gracie -- A Love Story," his reflections of his wife and longtime comedy partner Gracie Allen.

The record is held by blues musician Pinetop Perkins, a two-time Grammy winner, who was 97 in 2011 when he was announced as the winner of traditional blues album category for his album "Joined at the Hip."

Carter, at 94, went into this 2019 Grammy Awards ceremony already No. 3 on that list, having taken the spoken word category in 2016 for his most recent audiobook at that time, "A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety." This year's recognition gave him his ninth Grammy nomination.

With the win today, Carter is the top Grammy-winning ex-president.

Barack Obama also won twice in the spoken word category: in 2008 for his audiobook for "The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream" and two years earlier for "Dreams from My Father."

President Bill Clinton also has taken home two of the four spoken-word category Grammys for which he has been nominated: in 2005 for "My Life," a year after he won the spoken word album for children Grammy for his narration of Jean-Pascal Beintus' composition "Wolf Tracks."

Sponsored Video Stories from LifeZette

Richard Nixon received one nomination in 1978 for his role in the album "The Nixon Interviews with David Frost," making him the only Republican president ever nominated.

A posthumous presidential nomination, again in the spoken-word category, went to Harry S. Truman for "The Truman Tapes" album released in 1977.

John F. Kennedy also scored one nomination in the spoken-word category for the album "The Kennedy Wit," released in 1964 after his assassination.

(c)2019 Los Angeles Times

Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

 

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus