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LA voters to decide whether hotels must rent vacant rooms to unhoused Angelenos

Julia Wick, Los Angeles Times on

Published in News & Features

During his public comment, Ray Patel asked all the hotel owners in the room to stand up, saying their operations would be dramatically affected if the proposal was directly approved. Patel instead urged the city to use Project Roomkey's voluntary participation as a model.

"Hotels would gladly volunteer their hotels to participate in programs as long as there's a wraparound service which includes mental health service, social service, 24-hour security and somebody's there to hold their hand and help them get into permanent housing," Patel said.

Several speakers also raised concerns about the lack of details regarding how the sweeping proposal would work.

"We have no economic data about what it will cost the city," Stuart Waldman, president of the Valley Industry and Commerce Association, said, noting the lack of funding source and the fact that rates had not yet been set for hotel rooms.

"Hotels did not cause the homeless problem. Hotels are not the solution for the homeless problem," Waldman said, to loud applause in the council chamber.

Richard Earle, a representative of independent hospitality insurance brokerage PetraRisk Solutions, argued that the program would reduce hotels' ability to procure and maintain insurance.

"Insurance carriers will legitimately pull coverage," Earle said. "The business is underwritten with risks that involve guests and business travelers, not residents who bring a whole set of separate implications."

 

But Carly Kirchen, an organizer with Unite Here Local 11, argued that hotel operators and associations were unfairly prejudiced against unhoused Angelenos.

"The hotel operators would have you believe that every person experiencing homelessness is so sick that they are a danger to the people around them. But this myth argument misrepresents who is actually experiencing homelessness," Kirchen said, explaining that hotel workers are among those most affected by the housing crisis, with thousands of their members facing eviction.

"Even as a union member with a good-paying job I was recently homeless due to the housing crisis in our city," said Bambian Taft, who identified herself as a hotel minibar attendant and former housekeeper. Taft said she had recently paid out of pocket to stay at hotels with her daughters during a time when there was "no work for me at the hotel."

She was one of a handful of hotel workers who spoke in support of the proposal.

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©2022 Los Angeles Times. Visit latimes.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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