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Rural areas send their sickest patients to cities, straining hospitals

By Alex Smith, KCUR on

Published in News & Features

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Registered nurse Pascaline Muhindura has spent the past eight months treating COVID-19 patients at Research Medical Center in Kansas City, Missouri.

But when she returns home to her small town of Spring Hill, Kansas, she's often stunned by what she sees, like on a recent stop for carryout food.

"No one in the entire restaurant was wearing a mask," Muhindura said. "And there's no social distancing. I had to get out, because I almost had a panic attack. I was like, 'What is going on with people? Why are we still doing this?'"

Many rural communities across the U.S. have resisted masks and calls for social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic, but now rural counties are experiencing record-high infection and death rates.

Critically ill rural patients are often sent to city hospitals for high-level treatment and, as their numbers grow, some urban hospitals are buckling under the added strain.

Kansas City has a mask mandate, but in many smaller communities nearby, masks aren't required — or masking orders are routinely ignored. In the past few months, rural counties in both Kansas and Missouri have seen some of the highest rates of COVID-19 in the country.

 

At the same time, according to an analysis by KHN, about 3 in 4 counties in Kansas and Missouri don't have a single intensive care unit bed, so when people from these places get critically ill, they're sent to city hospitals.

A recent patient count at St. Luke's Health System in Kansas City showed a quarter of COVID-19 patients had come from outside the metro area.

Two-thirds of the patients coming from rural areas need intensive care and stay in the hospital for an average of two weeks, said Dr. Marc Larsen, who leads COVID-19 treatment at St. Luke's.

"Not only are we seeing an uptick in those patients in our hospital from the rural community, they are sicker when we get them because (doctors in smaller communities) are able to handle the less sick patients," said Larsen. "We get the sickest of the sick."

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