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Color of Money: What you don't know about cybersecurity can cost you

Michelle Singletary on

Krebs spends a lot of time introducing the major and minor spam players. It's like a Jason Bourne movie but with criminals who don't shoot at folks (well, some do). They instead fire out malicious spam infecting tens of millions of computers and, as a result, rake in millions of dollars.

Waiting for you at the end of the book is a very resourceful chapter on how to protect yourself. You'll be safer following Krebs' three rules for online security:

-- Rule No. 1: "If you didn't go looking for it, don't install it."

-- Rule No. 2: "If you installed it, update it."

-- Rule No. 3: "If you no longer need it, remove it."

Even if you don't buy "Spam Nation," make Krebs' blog regular reading. His reporting will frighten you. It does me. But as he writes, "those who endeavor to remain blissfully unaware of their role in becoming part of the solution will almost invariably end up becoming part of the problem."

I'm hosting an online discussion about "Spam Nation" at noon Eastern time on Nov. 2 at washingtonpost.com/discussions. Krebs will join me to answer your cybersecurity questions.

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Readers can write to Michelle Singletary c/o The Washington Post, 1301 K St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20071. Her email address is michelle.singletary@washpost.com. Follow her on Twitter (@SingletaryM) or Facebook (www.facebook.com/MichelleSingletary). Comments and questions are welcome, but due to the volume of mail, personal responses may not be possible. Please also note comments or questions may be used in a future column, with the writer's name, unless a specific request to do otherwise is indicated.

(c) 2017, Washington Post Writers Group

 

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