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Auto review: Corvette Stingray may be too fast and furious for mere mortals

Scott Sturgis, The Philadelphia Inquirer on

Published in Business News

Trust me — it's all true. You can be going far too fast before you're aware of it.

Shifty: The eight-speed transmission sports paddle shifters, which are best left alone unless you can hit them every third of a second. I actually slowed the car by not keeping up with shifting, when the tach started getting to redline and then the engine dialed off the acceleration.

The push button-ish transmission features unusual pull-type levers for Reverse and Drive, and I'm a fan. They require more concentration than a buttons-alone setup does for changing gears.

On the road: Sturgis son-In-law 1.0 said it best. "I'd rather drive a slower car fast than a fast car slow."

The week before the Corvette, I tested the Volkswagen GTI Autobahn and just had a roaring good time. The GTI is made for country roads, and it just zigs and zags and goes quickly at lower speeds. The Corvette definitely handles curves and corners like a boss, but the fun falls apart with Corvette-like velocity every time you get behind another car.

And other cars are a problem. Sports car people are pushing on your rear bumper in the passing lane — doing north of 80 — while the hall monitors pull right out in front of you to "teach you a lesson," I imagine. Sigh.

 

The Corvette with Z51 Performance Package ($5,000) does have plenty of modes — weather, my mode, touring, sport and track.

Driver's seat: The Corvette sports a real cockpit feel, with everything angled toward the driver.

Almost all passengers and I had the same complaint — the GT2 bucket seats ($1,495) are tight in the bolster and a little sharp in the lumbar.

Friend and stuff: With just a two-seater, you're not carrying much stuff. At 5-10, I had enough room behind the seat to store my backpack, but I do sit more upright than the average driver. It should be OK for tall people.

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