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Shopping abroad for cheaper medication? Here's what you need to know

Bernard J. Wolfson, Kaiser Health News on

Published in Business News

In its effort to temper the sky-high prices Americans pay for many vital medications, the Trump administration last month unveiled a plan that would legalize the importation of selected prescription drugs from countries where they sell for far less. But the plan addresses imports only at the wholesale level; it is silent about the transactions by millions of Americans who already buy their medications outside the United States.

Americans routinely skirt federal law by crossing into Canada and Mexico or tapping online pharmacies abroad to buy prescription medications at a fraction of the price they would pay at home.

In some cases, they do it out of desperation. It's the only way they can afford the drugs they need to stay healthy -- or alive. And they do it despite warnings from the Food and Drug Administration, echoed by the pharmaceutical industry, about the risk of contaminated or counterfeit products.

"The reality is that literally millions of people get their medications this way each year, and they are either saving a lot of money or they are getting a drug they wouldn't have been able to get because prices are too high here," says Gabriel Levitt, president of PharmacyChecker.com, an online company that allows people to compare prescription drug prices among international and U.S. pharmacies.

For people with diabetes, the inability to pay U.S. prices for insulin can be a matter of life and death, which is why so many families look to Canada or Mexico to meet their needs.

Robin Cressman, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2012 and has become a vocal advocate for lower drug prices, says that even with insurance she was paying $7,000 a year out-of-pocket for the two insulin drugs she needs: Lantus and Humalog. At one point, her credit card debt hit $30,000, says Cressman, 34, of Thousand Oaks, Calif.

 

While on an outing in Tijuana, Mexico, last year, she popped into a few pharmacies to see if they stocked her medications. With little fanfare, she says, she was able to buy both drugs over the counter for less than 10% of what they cost her north of the border.

"I left Tijuana that day absolutely trembling because I could not believe how easy it was for me to get my insulin," she says, "but also how little money it cost and how badly I was being extorted in the U.S."

If you are planning to cross the border for your medications, or get them through an online pharmacy abroad, here are two things you should know. First: It is technically illegal. Second: It is unlikely you will be prosecuted.

Despite the official prohibition, FDA guidelines allow federal agents to refrain from enforcement "when the quantity and purpose are clearly for personal use, and the product does not present an unreasonable risk to the user."

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