Chess Puzzles / Games

White to Play

White is truly loaded for bear here. All his pieces are ready to participate in the action. Black, however, has a good many men in the neighborhood ready to defend, so it will take drastic measures to break through the castled position. Have fun planning this attack! In fact, as a training exercise, get a piece of paper out and write down all the different variations you see and compare them with the main ones in the solution.

White to Play

This position is highly instructive and, at the same time, rather difficult. If you don’t get the answer, don’t worry about it. The way you get better is to play through these moves because this is one of the best examples of how to punish someone who hasn’t castled. You get to win material and the game if you act decisively here.

White to Play

White’s position looks on the surface to be desperate. However, he remembers that the queen combines the moves of the bishop and the rook. How does that help him mate Black?

White to Play

Let’s see what you learned from our last puzzle. This is from the famous Fischer-Benko game in the 1963-64 US championship. Wow! It’s been 50 years…Black had just taken White’s bishop on d4 and threatens the knight.

White to Play

When I ran across this puzzle in Reinfeld’s book (could not find a game reference), it immediately struck me how important an attacking idea was demonstrated here. In fact, another game played years ago popped right into my mind that Fischer had won with the same idea. I’ll give that puzzle next time. There’s a forced mate here.

White to Play

Fred Reinfeld was a strong master who published tons of chess books. They were generally aimed at the average player. His problem books are still used today and are now in algebraic reprint. One of his books was “Chess Quiz,” later titled “Win at Chess.” We’ll take some puzzles from his book this week. Enjoy! (Hint: one of the themes here is the back rank mate threat.)