Chess Puzzles / Games

White to Play

This position arose in a game, Janowski-Schallop, 1896. Black is obviously threatening both of White’s rooks. How did White deal with the situation?

White to Play

Anytime there are no pieces in front of a castled king position (even worse: none on either side of the king), you have to be aware of a mating attack against that king. Today’s position was from a US Open in 1946, and White found the right way to win.

White to Play

This is one of the most important king and pawn endings to know.If you are not careful as White, Black may very well be able to draw.

White to Play

Much of higher level chess is about square control. In this diagram, Black doesn’t control many squares. In chess, we call the bishop on e6 a “tall pawn.” The knight is in equally bad shape. White wraps it up with a nice square control theme move.