Chess Puzzles / Games

White to Play

Black had a very equal game until the White pawn on d4 became too much of a treat to resist. White was lying in wait for the unfortunate capture and responded with a move that cause Black to resign! What move did White find?

White to Play

Many times in chess, short tactical skirmishes, not necessarily leading to mate, decide the game. This game between John Nicholson and Stefan Baecklin in Hungary, 1939, started out: 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qa5 4.d4 Nf6 5.Nf3 Bf5 6.Bc4 c6 7.Bd2 Nbd7 8.Qe2 e6 9.Ne5 Be7 10.0–0–0 0–0 11.f3 Qc7 with White to play.

Black to Play

Black has just finished playing 6…Nd4 and White figured he had won a piece by playing 7.Bxd5. However, GM Lothar Schmid had a surprise in store for Glenn Gibbs in Lugano, Switzerland, in 1968. What was the move?

White to Play

Sometimes, when things are going well, one moment of inattention can ruin things. For example, I this game, Black was winning. He played 10…c6? instead of 10…Nc6! How did things go downhill very quickly from here?

White to Play

We’re in the midst of going through various openings to help you develop an awareness of combinations right in the opening. We’ve done the Scandinavian a bit and now we’re looking at the Alekhine’s Defense. A game, Hanada-Makamure, Japan, 1992, started out like this: 1.e4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e5 Nfd7 4.f4 e6 5.Qg4 c5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.Be2 f5 8.Qg3 a6 9.Ng5 Nd4 and ended up in our diagrammed position. What did White do next?

White to Play

ArcaMax Editor's Note: Thank you to the readers who wrote in about missing images with puzzles. The problem should be fixed and puzzle images that were missing should be updated on the Web site. We’ve been looking at miniatures of late. Today’s game started out: Cheah-Dada, Manila, 1992: 1.e4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e5 Nfd7 4.e6 fxe6 5.d4 g6 6.h4 Nf6 7.h5 Nxh5 8.Rxh5 gxh5 9.Qxh5+ Kd7 10.Nf3 Qe8 11.Qe5 Rg8. How do you continue here as White?