Chess Puzzles / Games

White to Play

Here’s another miniature study with the same difficulty: how do you get that pawn to the promotion square. It may look easy, but composer F. Prokop shows us that it takes a bit of finesse. Let’s see if you catch it.

White to Play

This is composed study week with the theme being a small number of pieces and pawns on the board. Today’s composition by L. Prokes is a very practical set up. White wins, but how? It looks like 1.Kxe7 only draws because of 1…Bxe5 and 1.d6 exd6 isn’t promising. What to do….

Black to Play

This, our last visit to the Lodz Chess Club of 1910, exhibits several of the sins of amateurs. White has apparently tried a two pawn and queen attack against Black, who has just methodically placed all his pieces on good central squares. This is in contrast to White who still has his bishop and rook sitting on their original squares and a knight not doing much of anything. So, in our game Kanel-A. Mund, how did Mr. Mund punish this sinner?

White to Play

In our “golden oldies” review courtesy of the 1910 British Chess Magazine we return to the Lodz Chess Club for this position. It is not clear who the players are. Rotlevi (Rubinstein’s poor victim of one of the greatest combinations of all time) is given as Black, but the winner is given as “N.N.” Perhaps it was reversed. I’m just not sure. Anyhow, Black is in the usual stew for not having castled and White is about to give him a lesson in mate threats.

Black to Play

While wandering through an old volume of the 1910 British Chess Magazine, I came across some game finishes from a century ago and thought I would share them with you. This first one, between Daniouschewski and Granass, from the Lodz Chess Club, is a mating pattern you should recognize if you’ve been coming here any length of time.

White to Play

Grandmaster Carl Schlechter, one of the strongest players in chess history, reached this winning position and made a horrible blunder! Pick a winning move and pick Schlechter’s blunder.