Chess Puzzles / Games

White to Play—Advanced Attacking Lesson One

For the next three weeks, we are going to start Pete’s Advanced Course on Attacking Chess. While we have spent a good deal of time on mates in two or three type compositions or real games with mates in two, three or a few more. However, one of the most difficult judgment calls to make for the average player is when and how to initiate a decisive attack if there is no immediate mate in a few moves. You will get the whole game score. You are encouraged to take out a set and go over it. Stop at the diagrammed position and write down what your possible ideas are, then look at the solution and see if you can imagine it in your head. If you treat the next three weeks and nine lessons as a chess course, you will improve your standard of play. Our first lesson in advanced attacking play is a game from 1867, DeVere vs. Steinitz. It started out this way: De Vere,Cecil Valentine - Steinitz,William [C67] Dundee Dundee, 1867 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0–0 Nxe4 5.Re1 Nd6 6.Nxe5 Nxe5 7.Rxe5+ Be7 8.d4 f6 9.Re1 Nxb5 10.Qh5+ g6 11.Qxb5 c6 12.Qb3 d5 13.c4 Kf7 14.Nc3 dxc4 15.Qxc4+ Kg7 16.d5 cxd5 17.Nxd5 Bf8

White to Play

Here’s the last of our back to basics positions. This one has some real challenges. White can’t afford to lose his pawn and it’s hard to mate with a bishop when the other guy has one, too. Not only that, but if the Black bishop gives himself up for the White pawn you have a problem! With that in mind, go to work!

White to Play

Our second back to basics position requires you to show your stuff in using the queen in all sorts of creative ways.

White to Play

This week is a Back to Basics week, and we’re going to start off with an easy one. White mates in three moves. There are at least three different ways to do it, so you have good odds!