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Chess Puzzles / Games

White to Play

While putting together the last puzzle of the year by taking the last puzzle from an 1846 Illustrated London News, the natural question was “What was the first puzzle of that year?” So, I looked! It was composed by an American champion, Charles Stanley. It is primitive by today’s standards, but it’s still fun to try these oldies.

White to Play

As this is the last chess puzzle of 2013, here’s a last chess puzzle of 1846, courtesy of the Illustrated London News of 1846. It’s a mate in four by Von S. Leow. There isn’t much to move, so you’re in the ballpark for finding a solution.

White to Play

One of the big questions amateurs ask when looking at all these mating attacks presented here is “How do you get to these positions?” Here’s a game that will show you one way it’s done. Grandmaster Michael Adams defeats G. Morrison in a very instructive game.

White to Play

Editor's Note: We apologize for any technical difficulties you may experience with getting the puzzle images to display properly. This is a site-wide problem and we are working hard to fix it. Stay tuned! There are quite a few ways to attack a castled position. We last week looked at how to key in on the g7 square. There are other squares to take advantage of. Take a look at this position. There are two “best” ways to go here of the more than two available. See if you can find them both.

Black to Play

Editor's Note: We apologize for any technical difficulties you may experience with getting the puzzle images to display properly. This is a site-wide problem and we are working hard to fix it. Stay tuned! This position is from Giri-Aronian, 2012. Aronian’s winning move here is a beautiful example of what we have talked about here quite often. Let’s go through Black’s thoughts here. His bishop and c-pawn have all of White’s 2nd rank squares in front of the king covered. A queen check on f4 is available, but the knight could take it. If only the rook on e8 could then go to e1 to mate White, but there’s a rook on h1 covering that. If that rook were on e1, then the queen check would work…hmmm.

Black to Play

Editor's Note: We apologize for any technical difficulties you may experience with getting the puzzle images to display properly. This is a site-wide problem and we are working hard to fix it. Stay tuned! We continue our theme of attacking the g-pawn in the castled position with a dandy of a finish from the game Field-Tenner, New York, 1933. Will seeing how the last two puzzles turned out help you solve this one? Let me know!