Chess Puzzles / Games

Black to Play

This is from a 5-minute game I played recently played as Black. It’s your move, and you have three minutes and nineteen seconds to come up with your reply to White’s BxN on d5.

White to Play

Alertness is a key factor when playing a game of chess. In today’s position Aroshidze was alert and Renteria wasn’t. The game, played in Spain this month, opened this way: 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nf6 5.Bd3 Nxe4 6.Bxe4 Nd7 7.Qe2 Nf6. How did alertness pay off here?

White to Play

Fred Reinfeld’s classic 1001 Brilliant Ways to Checkmate has been re-issued in algebraic notation. Edited by Bruce Alberston, it also has composed problems toward the end of the book. Most people don’t realize it, but “mates in two” and such give you practice in how to deal with unfamiliar positions. Composition rarely resemble practical play, but they still teach good lessons, like this one, today—a mate in two.

Black to Play

Fred Reinfeld’s classic 1001 Brilliant Ways to Checkmate has been re-issued in algebraic notation. Edited by Bruce Alberston, it has some dandy tactical challenges. Today’s offering seems to give you all sorts of ways to mate White as the White king is so exposed. It’s a forced mate!