Chess Puzzles / Games

White to Play

Fred Reinfeld’s classic 1001 Brilliant Ways to Checkmate has been re-issued in algebraic notation. Edited by Bruce Alberston, it also has composed problems toward the end of the book. Most people don’t realize it, but “mates in two” and such give you practice in how to deal with unfamiliar positions. Composition rarely resemble practical play, but they still teach good lessons, like this one, today—a mate in two.

Black to Play

Fred Reinfeld’s classic 1001 Brilliant Ways to Checkmate has been re-issued in algebraic notation. Edited by Bruce Alberston, it has some dandy tactical challenges. Today’s offering seems to give you all sorts of ways to mate White as the White king is so exposed. It’s a forced mate!

White to Play

Fred Reinfeld’s classic 1001 Brilliant Ways to Checkmate has been re-issued in algebraic notation. Just as you come here to test your skills, this book does what I do here except for the explanations I often give in some detail. Still, it’s a great way to improve your tactics. I highly recommend it.

White to Play

I ran across this game and couldn’t help but be intrigued by White’s exploitation of the pin of the knight on f6. Haven’t see anything like it.

White to Play

There’s an old chess saying that “He who takes the queen knight’s pawn sleeps in the streets.” Black has done that on b2. How do you get him to sleep in the streets?