Chess Puzzles / Games

White to Play

Alexandria Kosteniuk became a women’s grandmaster at age fourteen! Here, she finishes off I. Zakurdjaeva in 1998. How did she do it?

White to Play

Bruce Alberston, a wonderful chess teacher and author as well as very strong master, died in the last week in November. He authored some 20 books, the most popular being his chess puzzle books. They were popular with amateur players and coaches because they really honed your tactical skills. He even challenged you with mates in one! Today’s composition is just that: mate in one!

Black to Play

Attacking a castled position is easier when there are no defenders in front. Here, we have some stout supporters of the king. How did Black get through or around them? A hint, Black had just sacrificed his knight on g2 and White took it with the king. Why did Black do that?

White to Play

I have to apologize for the wrong diagram set-up in the previous puzzle. If you played through the game score you would have noticed that the knight should be on f3. So, in the spirit of diagram fun, here’s a different problem. White has more than one mate in one in this position. The question is how many mates in one are there?

Black to Play

OK, this is a position that leads to checkmate; however it takes a while.It is a forcing line, though, so it’s doable. This is from a real game:Reeders-Nauta, Amsterdam, 1917: 1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.f4 d5 4.fxe5 Nxe4 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.Be2 Bc5 7.d4 Nxd4 8.Nxd4 Qh4+ 9.g3 Nxg3 10.Nf3

Black to Play

OK, this is a position that leads to checkmate; however it takes a while.It is a forcing line, though, so it’s doable.