Games

/

Entertainment

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

On my facebook page, one of my posters put up the end of a 3-minute game they played. Wolff King Morrow was pretty deep into the game with probably a healthy chunk of his 3 minutes gone, yet he found a very pretty finish. You have less than 3 minutes to find it!

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

An exciting way to finish the week—a slash and burn kingside attack by Boros over Szabo back in the 1930s.

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This composition was one of Irving Chernev’s favorites. There is a humorous point to it at the end. It’s White to play and draw. Composition by Bogdassaryanz.

View solution

Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

There’s not much on the board, but a lot is happening. At Goteborg in 1955, GM Arthur Bisguier, Black, to play, is a rook and knight up, but his opponent, Boris Spassky, who would become world champion in 1969, is about to get a queen and make things interesting. Bisguier found a way achieve victory here. What was it?

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Yes it’s White to Play, but Black is the one to perform the mating move! Our last puzzle this week is a self-mate. White goes first and forces Black to mate him. It’s a little odd, but the solution is ingenious. It’s a composition by Shinkman. BTW, that Black pawn is there for several reasons, but the White king still has to head toward ...

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here’s another mate with just a few pieces on the board. Composed by Speckman in 1957. Not much on the board, but a lot goes on. And, yes, you’re not being told how many moves to the forced mate. You must find the fastest mate.

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We are going to do composed problems this week, and, following our pattern of late, the first one is a simple two-mover, allegedly composed by Pope John Paul II.

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We will end this week with one last bishop vs. knight ending to see if you “get it.” The rooks are thrown in to make it a tiny bit more complicated. It’s also from a Fischer game, who was White vs. Reshevsky in their match in 1961.

View solution

Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Last time out, you were shown a beginner’s lesson in a bishop vs. knight ending. If you thought that was too elementary, here’s an example of GM Mark Taimanov losing a game because he couldn’t figure out how to find the drawing line against Fischer in their candidates’ match in 1971 in Vancouver. Let’s see if you can do better than the...

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Here it is—chess summer school Monday. This is a simple yet very useful chess lesson for beginners. What should White play here? This is from Berger-Chigorin, Barmen, 1905.

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Whit has some big problems here, and is clearly losing—or is he? Can you find a saving series of moves for him?

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

The “big guys” miss great moves, too. In this game between Psakhis and Sygulski in 1987 found them in this position. Psakhis played 14.Bd3 and eventually won. How could he have earned a brilliancy prize here?

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is yet another chess summer school Monday. Let’s consider it an advanced lesson in terms of the difficulty of the problem for beginners, but let’s also consider it an early lesson on thinking about a chess position. I have often pointed out the need on every move for players to look at all checks, captures and forced moves—for your ...

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Today’s puzzle is taken from a new book put out by Russell Enterprises: My First Book of Chess Tactics by David MacEnulty. MacEnulty has won all sorts of awards for his chess teaching and even had a movie based on his efforts with kids in inner city schools. So, this is a welcomed and practical book for those starting out in chess. He covers ...

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Today’s puzzle is taken from a supposed blitz game between Lasker and Capablanca. I’ve seen two versions of who had White! Anyhow, it’s a fun “to play and win” position.

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is one of those famous positions in chess history. Dr. Emanuel Lasker, who had held the world throne for 27 years until 1921, has just played 24…Qb5, which wins in every variation except one—the one his opponent Carlos Torre found.

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Some of you may recognize this position from the Fischer-Spassky return match in 1992. Can you match Fischer’s mating continuation here? Remember: don’t just give the quickie Black cooperating mating line.

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Today is our “summer school” day for those new to chess. Tactics are very important in chess. You have to see the dance steps that are possible in order to do the dance properly. The best advice we have often given here is to look at all check and captures. All. Even your opponent’s. When you try to think ahead, see if you can keep those ...

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re going to look at another entry from the vastly entertaining and instructive book “Draw” by Leonid Verkhovsky. It’s published by Russell Enterprises as a translation of the original from the 1970s. Why is that important? Well, there is a foreword by Mikhail Tal. You don’t need to be Tal to figure out that White is in dire ...

View solution

White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Although we do mostly “play and win” positions, it’s good to remember that sometimes chess players in dire straits have to try and salvage a draw. Osmanagic was in such a fix against Grandmaster S. Gligoric in Yugoslavia in 1963.

View solution

Social Connections

Comics

Hi and Lois Darrin Bell Ask Shagg Brilliant Mind of Edison Lee Ballard Street Rugrats