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White to Play

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In this our 11th week of chess summer school, we’re looking at kingside attacks. Here, from the game Khenkin-Anagnostopoulos, Greece, 2000, White finishes Black off very quickly. It follows that old rule we have harped on here for years!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Wow! Week 11 of Chess Summer School. Time flies. This week we’re going to look at attacking a castled king. Our firs example is from an Olympiad in 1933 where “Mickey” Mikenas topples then world championship contender Salo Flohr. Can you match Mickey?

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

This is our last endgame challenge for Chess Summer School, but it’s a dandy! Don’t be fooled by its simple appearance. GM John Nunn picked out some incredible teaching problems.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

(Due to technical difficulties, this puzzle was left out Wednesday of last week. This then is your Thursday Bonus Puzzle!) Being alert to possibilities is our theme for today and our next puzzle. In this game, Khavsky-Korolev, Leningrad, 1962, White appears to be in dire straits. Black has just played Qg4. If White takes the queen, then 1.hxg4 ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, week ten (!) of chess summer school, we have our second puzzle as we are going back to king and pawn endings to see if you remember some basic principles. This week is based on a contest run by GM John Nunn in British Chess Magazine in 1999. White’s task here is to draw.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, week ten (!) of chess summer school, we’re going back to king and pawn endings to see if you remember some basic principles. This week is based on a contest run by GM John Nunn in British Chess Magazine in 1999.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

When we were looking at Dan Heisman’s positions for determining whether a move was safe, a position occurred to me that I had written about years ago. In the following position after 1.e4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.exd5 Nxd5 4.Bc4 Nb6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nf3 e5 7.d3 Bg4 8.h3 Bh5. If you have been paying attention to this column over the years you know we have ...

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Last week, I decided to devote a week’s worth of chess summer school to the new book, “Is Your Move Safe” by Dan Heisman. I now feel totally justified in doing that because the Chess Journalists of America have awarded it as the best book (instruction) for 2015-16. We’ll do a bonus example to note the award. The position occurs ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, our third installment looking into Dan Heisman’s new book, “Is Your Move Safe?” we’re going to look at a position I love. It comes in all shapes and sizes, but the mistakes in thinking made in this type of position are legion. It’s not a dazzling mating position. It’s a simple “here’s why I lose a lot of chess games” ...

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, our second installment looking into Dan Heisman’s new book, “Is Your Move Safe?”, we’re going to look at a familiar opening position. Years ago, in a match against a future master, I reached a position similar to this as White and was astonished to see my opponent play the “not safe” move! In the ensuing years, I’ve seen ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, our eighth week of chess summer school, we are going to take excerpts from a great new book by popular chess teacher Dan Heisman. His book, “Is Your Move Safe?”, successfully teaches the average chess player how to think about deciding what move to play. He has a real chess teacher’s insight to what goes wrong and comes up with ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re finishing our 7th week of chess summer school with our last exercise in following a series of checks through to mate. For those of you who found this helpful, please get in touch. I’d like to hear your experience with these puzzles. This position is of particular interest because a famous grandmaster and chess teacher, Siegbert ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, our seventh week of chess summer school, we are repeating the theme from last week: training your mind to think more than two moves ahead. We’ve made it easier by making every move a check. You should have fun with this one.

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In this, our seventh week of chess summer school, we are repeating the theme from last week: training your mind to think more than two moves ahead. We’ve made it easier by making every move a check. This game was won by the great chess teacher and grandmaster Siegbert Tarrasch. It was an “odds game.” Dr. T took off his queen (!) at the ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In our sixth week in chess summer school, we’re trying to get you to think more than a few moves ahead. It’s a little easier because all the moves to mate are checks! When you look at this position, you should realize something. In order to attack a castled position, you have to aim your pieces at the enemy king’s position. Try and get as...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

In our sixth week in chess summer school, we’re trying to get you to think more than a few moves ahead. It’s a little easier because all the moves to mate are checks! This was a game, P. Schmidt-Dr. Schmidt, Heidelberg, 1946

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Black to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

We’re now starting the sixth week of chess summer school with an example from one of my chess students who reached this position on the ICC a few days ago. I always tell my students to look at all checks and captures. She saw a capture that would work, Nxc2, but missed that there was a mate in four in the position. All four moves were checks. ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

Our last rook and pawn ending in this fifth week of chess summer school is a very common one. White, of course, needs to keep the Black king from crossing the rook’s “laser line” on the board, but how do you get the king and pawn up to the other end of the board without unending checks? There’s a way!

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

For week five of chess summer school, we’re sticking with the very essential rook and pawn endings. BTW, if you’re just getting on board with this, go back to previous weeks in our archive. Today’s position also happens a fair amount of times. Not only can you find your rook in front of the passed pawn, but often your king finds a hiding ...

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White to Play

Games / Chess Puzzles /

For week five of chess summer school, we’re sticking with the very essential rook and pawn endings. We’ve been looking at key ideas that pop up with surprising regularity in these endings, so these “little tricks” are worth remembering. Let’s see if you learned a concept from last week with this position.

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